Money for everyone

Front Cover
Policy Press, Jun 27, 2013 - Business & Economics - 300 pages
Due to government cuts, the benefits system is currently a hot topic. In this timely book, a Citizen’s Income (sometimes called a Basic Income) is defined as an unconditional, non-withdrawable income for every individual as a right of citizenship. This much-needed book, written by an experienced researcher and author, is the first for over a decade to analyse the social, economic and labour market advantages of a Citizen's Income in the UK. It demonstrates that it would be simple and cheap to administer, would reduce inequality, enhance individual freedom and would be good for the economy, social cohesion, families, and the employment market. It also contains international comparisons and links with broader issues around the meaning of poverty and inequality, making a valuable contribution to the debate around benefits. Accessibly written, this is essential reading for policy-makers, researchers, teachers, students, and anyone interested in the future of our society and our economy
 

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Contents

How did we get to where we are now?
17
Why do some reform proposals succeed and some fail?
29
How might we implement a Citizens Income?
49
Has it ever happened?
65
coherence and administrative
81
the family then now and in the
99
incentives efficiency and dignity
113
the labour market then now
131
Who should receive a Citizens Income?
187
Is a Citizens Income politically feasible?
211
Can we afford a Citizens Income?
241
Alternatives to a Citizens Income
255
What can a Citizens Income not cope with?
265
A brief summary
275
Select bibliography
281
Subject index
291

Would people work?
149
Would a Citizens Income be an answer to poverty inequality
161

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About the author (2013)

Malcolm Torry is director of the Citizen's Income Trust.

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