Social Scandinavia in the Viking Age

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Contents

I
1
II
23
III
34
IV
57
V
72
VI
88
VII
109
VIII
123
XIV
235
XV
248
XVI
269
XVII
292
XVIII
317
XIX
331
XX
351
XXI
363

IX
143
X
163
XI
179
XII
191
XIII
215

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Page 215 - ... may either take a nap or stroll about a little while for pastime and to see what other good merchants are employed with, or whether any new wares have come to the borough which you ought to buy. On returning to your lodgings examine your wares, lest they suffer damage after coming into your hands. If they are found to be injured and you are about to dispose of them, do not conceal the flaws from the purchaser : show him what the defects are and make such a bargain as you can; then you cannot...
Page 235 - The man who is to be a trader will have to brave many perils, sometimes at sea and sometimes in heathen lands, but nearly always among alien peoples; and it must be his constant purpose to act discreetly wherever he happens to be. On the sea he must be alert and fearless. When you are in a market town, or wherever you are, be polite and agreeable; then you will secure the friendship of all good men.
Page 436 - THE VIKING AGE. The' Early History, Manners, and Customs of the Ancestors of the English-Speaking Nations.
Page 444 - WORSAAE (JJA)— INDUSTRIAL ARTS OF DENMARK, FROM THE EARLIEST TIMES TO THE DANISH CONQUEST OF ENGLAND.
Page 163 - Fair is the Lithe; so fair that it has never seemed to me so fair; the corn fields are white to harvest and the home mead is mown; and now I will ride back home, and not fare abroad at all.
Page 123 - ... talk if you are very hungry. At this very day a gentleman makes it the rule to do the same thing. Accordingly we see that these rough men of the North must have had a good deal of social refinement — refinement not of dress or of speech, but of feeling. Still, says the poet, one's own home is the best, though it be but a cottage. "A man is a man in his own house.
Page 72 - Then they sent for Hallgerda, and she came thither, and two women with her. She had on a cloak of rich blue woof, and under it a scarlet kirtle, and a silver girdle round her waist, but her hair came down on both sides of her bosom, and she had turned the locks up under her girdle. She sat down between Hrut and her father, and she greeted them all with kind words, and spoke well and boldly, and asked what was the news. After that she ceased speaking.
Page 111 - All people and nations shall tell of the word I spake, yet being unborn, wherein I vowed a vow that I would flee in fear from neither fire nor the sword; even so have I done hitherto, and shall I depart therefrom now I am old? Yea withal never shall the maidens mock these my sons at the games, and cry out at them that they fear death; once alone must all men need die...
Page 432 - Araber Berichte über die Russen älterer Zeit. Text und Uebersetzung mit kritischphilologischen Anmerkungen ; nebst drei Beilagen über sogenannte Russen-Stämme und Kiew, die Warenger und das Warenger-Meer, und das Land Wisu, ebenfalls nach Arabischen Schriftstellern, von CM Frähn, etc., Herausgegeben von der Kaiserlichen Akademie der Wissenschaften.
Page 397 - Gungni's point, and Grani's breast ; on the Norn's nail, and the owl's beak. — All that were engraven were scraped off, and mixed with holy mead, and sent away on every side. The Anses have some, the Elves have some, some the wise Wanes have ; mortal men have some. — There are Beech-runes, Help-runes, Love-runes, and great Power-runes, for whomsoever will, to have for charms, pure and genuine, till the world falls in ruin. Profit by them if thou canst.

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