A Companion to Roman Rhetoric

Front Cover
William Dominik, Jon Hall
John Wiley & Sons, Jan 11, 2010 - History - 544 pages
A Companion to Roman Rhetoric introduces the reader to the wide-ranging importance of rhetoric in Roman culture.
  • A guide to Roman rhetoric from its origins to the Renaissance and beyond
  • Comprises 32 original essays by leading international scholars
  • Explores major figures Cicero and Quintilian in-depth
  • Covers a broad range of topics such as rhetoric and politics, gender, status, self-identity, education, and literature
  • Provides suggestions for further reading at the end of each chapter
  • Includes a glossary of technical terms and an index of proper names and rhetorical concepts
 

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Contents

Confronting Roman Rhetoric
3
Contents
21
and Acculturation
23
and Gaius Gracchus
54
Rhetorical Education and Social Reproduction
69
Roman Senatorial Oratory
122
Panegyric
136
Roman Oratorical Invective
149
Grammarians and Rhetoricians
285
The Elder Seneca and Quintilian
297
Quintilian as Rhetorician and Teacher
307
Roman Rhetoric and Its Afterlife
354
Rhetoric and Literature at Rome
369
Vergils Aeneid
382
Horace Persius and Juvenal
396
Rhetoric and Ovid
413

Roman Rhetorical Handbooks
163
Latin Prose Style
181
Memory and the Roman Orator
195
Wit and Humor in Roman Rhetoric
207
Theory and Practice
218
Lost Orators of Rome
237
Cicero as Rhetorician
250
Cicero as Orator
264
Rhetoric and the Younger Seneca
425
Rhetoric and Historiography
439
Bibliography
451
Glossary of Technical Terms
487
Index Locorum
495
General Index
502
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

William Dominik is Professor of Classics at the University of Otago. He is a contributor to A Companion to Ancient Epic (2005) and A Companion to the Classical Tradition (2006). He has also published numerous books, chapters, and articles on Roman literature and other topics.

Jon Hall is Senior Lecturer in Classics at the University of Otago. He is the author of numerous articles and chapters on Cicero’s oratory and rhetorical treatises. He has also completed a book on Cicero’s correspondence.

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