An Impartial Examination of the Second[-fourth] Volume of Mr. Daniel Neal's History of the Puritans, Volume 3

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R. Gosling, 1737 - England
 

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Page 181 - Lift up your heads, O ye gates; even lift them up, ye everlasting doors; and the King of glory shall come in.
Page 366 - This made him more irresolute than the conjuncture of his affairs would admit; if he had been of a rougher and more imperious nature he would have found more respect and duty. And his not applying some severe cures to approaching evils proceeded from the lenity of his nature, and the tenderness of his conscience, which, in all cases of blood, made him choose the softer way, and not hearken to severe counsels, how reasonably soever urged.
Page 115 - ... arts in it not worthy a good man ; as an Irishman of very mean and low condition afterwards acknowledged, that being brought to him, as an evidence of one part of the charge against the lord lieutenant, in a particular of which a person of so vile quality would not be reasonably thought a competent informer ; Mr. Pym gave him money to buy him a satin suit and cloak ; in which equipage he appeared at the trial, and gave his .evidence...
Page 368 - ... so disguised to him that he believed it to be just. He had a tenderness and compassion of nature, which restrained him from ever doing a hard-hearted thing: and therefore he was so...
Page 192 - that it was a business of great importance that was before them; and therefore that they should take heed what they did in it: that there was a time indeed when intentions and words were...
Page 162 - Ordination was, with some strange violence, restrained : for when I was going on in my wonted course, which no law or ordinance had inhibited, certain forward volunteers in the city, banding together, stir up the Mayor and Aldermen and Sheriffs to call me to an account for an open violation of their Covenant. To this purpose, divers of them came to my gates at a very unseasonable time ; and, knocking very vehemently, required to speak with the Bishop. Messages were sent to them to know their business...
Page 28 - Majefty was born, hath faithfully liv'd, "and to which He will die a willing Sacrifice ) their Laws, *' Liberties, Privileges, and Safety of Parliament, were fo> " amply fettled, and eftablifh'd, or offer'd to be fo by his " Majefty, before any Army was raifed againft Him, and long "before any raifed by Him for his defence, that if nothing *
Page 213 - Beersheba : he prayed the king to come down in these words, Come thou, and take the city, lest I take it, and it be called by my name.
Page 118 - Eldest Son and Heir ; or if a Man do levy War against our Lord the King in his Realm, or be adherent to the King's Enemies in his Realm, giving to them Aid and Comfort, in the Realm, or elsewhere, and thereof be probably attainted of open Deed by the People of their Condition.
Page 327 - The letter was delivered, but had no other effect than the sending to the officer to despatch his order, reserving the Italian to the last. Sir Charles Lucas was their first work; who fell dead; upon which sir George Lisle ran to him, embraced him...

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