Conservation Biogeography

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Richard Ladle, Robert J. Whittaker
Wiley, Jan 6, 2011 - Science - 256 pages
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The Earth’s ecosystems are in the midst of an unprecedentedperiod of change as a result of human action. Many habitats havebeen completely destroyed or divided into tiny fragments, othershave been transformed through the introduction of new species, orthe extinction of native plants and animals, while anthropogenicclimate change now threatens to completely redraw the geographicmap of life on this planet. The urgent need to understand andprescribe solutions to this complicated and interlinked set ofpressing conservation issues has lead to the transformation of thevenerable academic discipline of biogeography – the study ofthe geographic distribution of animals and plants. The newlyemerged sub-discipline of conservation biogeography uses theconceptual tools and methods of biogeography to address real worldconservation problems and to provide predictions about the fate ofkey species and ecosystems over the next century. This bookprovides the first comprehensive review of the field in a series ofclosely interlinked chapters addressing the central issues withinthis exciting and important subject. 

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About the author (2011)

Richard J. Ladle was the founding Director of OxfordUniversity’s MSc in Biodiversity, Conservation andManagement. Since 2009 he has been working in Brazil as aninternational conservation consultant and science writer. He iscurrently a Visiting Professor at the Federal University ofAlagoas, teaching and doing research on diverse andinterdisciplinary aspects of conservation, biogeography andecology.

Robert J. Whittaker is the current Academic Director ofthe MSc Biodiversity Conservation and Management, and holds thetitle of Professor of Biogeography in the School of Geography andthe Environment, University of Oxford. He is a founding member andpast President (2009–2010) of the InternationalBiogeography Society. He is currently editor-in-chief of theJournal of Biogeography. He has a long-standing interest inisland biogeography, patterns and processes controlling diversity,and the application of biogeography to conservation.

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