Polyglot Reader, and Guide for Translation: Consisting of a Series of English Extracts, with Their Translation Into French, German, Spanish, and Italian; [the Several Parts Designed to Serve as Mutual Keys]. English Text

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D. Appleton and Company, 1867 - Readers and speakers

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Page 260 - Signior Antonio, many a time and oft, In the Rialto, you have rated me About my moneys and my usances : Still have I borne it with a patient shrug ; For sufferance is the badge of all our tribe...
Page 260 - If I can catch him once upon the hip, I will feed fat the ancient grudge I bear him. He hates our sacred nation, and he rails, Even there where merchants most do congregate, On me, my bargains, and my well-won thrift, Which he calls interest. Cursed be my tribe, If I forgive him ! Bass.
Page 144 - I WAS ever of opinion, that the honest man who married, and brought up a large family, did more service than he who continued single, and only talked of population.
Page 279 - Bozzaris! with the storied brave Greece nurtured in her glory's time, Rest thee — there is no prouder grave, Even in her own proud clime. We tell thy doom without a sigh; For thou art freedom's now, and fame's — One of the few, the immortal names That were not born to die.
Page 262 - No war, or battle's sound Was heard the world around ; The idle spear and shield were high up hung ; The hooked chariot stood Unstained with hostile blood ; The trumpet spake not to the armed throng ; And kings sat still with awful eye, As if they surely knew their sovran Lord was by.
Page 263 - But peaceful was the night Wherein the Prince of light His reign of peace upon the earth began...
Page 263 - Father of all! in every age, In every clime adored, By saint, by savage, and by sage, Jehovah, Jove, or Lord! Thou Great First Cause, least understood, Who all my sense confined To know but this, that Thou art good, And that myself am blind; Yet gave me, in this dark estate, To see the good from ill; And binding Nature fast in fate, Left free the human will.
Page 122 - To sweeten the beverage, a lump of sugar was laid beside each cup: and the company alternately nibbled and sipped with great decorum, until an improvement was introduced by a shrewd and economic old lady, which was to suspend a large lump directly over the tea-table by a string from the ceiling, so that it could be swung from mouth to mouth ; an ingenious expedient which is still kept up by some families in Albany, but which prevails without exception in Communipaw, Bergen, Flatbush, and all our...
Page 81 - Their skins served us for clothing. HE had scattered them over the country, and taught us how to take them. HE had caused the earth to produce corn for bread. All this HE had done for his red children, because he loved them.
Page 122 - Vrouw, to any question that was asked them ; behaving in all things like decent, well-educated damsels. As to the gentlemen, each of them tranquilly smoked his pipe, and seemed lost in contemplation of the blue...

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