First book of the Faerie Queene, canto I-IV

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F. C. & J. Rivington, 1805 - English poetry
 

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Page lxv - Flowers worthy of Paradise, which not nice Art In beds and curious knots, but Nature boon Pour'd forth profuse on hill, and dale, and plain...
Page 7 - A GENTLE Knight was pricking on the plaine, Ycladd in mightie armes and silver shielde, Wherein old dints of deepe woundes did remaine, The cruell markes of many a bloody fielde ; Yet armes till that time did he never wield : His angry steede did chide his foming bitt, As much disdayning to the curbe to yield : Full jolly knight he seemd, and faire did sitt, As one for knightly giusts and fierce encounters fitt.
Page xxxv - To th' instruments divine respondence meet; The silver sounding instruments did meet With the base murmure of the waters fall; The waters fall with difference discreet, Now soft, now loud, unto the wind did call; The gentle warbling wind low answered to all.
Page cxi - And there appeared another wonder in heaven ; and behold a great red dragon, having seven heads and ten horns, and seven crowns upon his heads. And his tail drew the third part of the stars of heaven, and did cast them to the earth...
Page cxii - So he carried me away in the spirit into the wilderness : and I saw a woman sit upon a scarlet coloured beast, full of names of blasphemy, having seven heads and ten horns. And the woman was arrayed in purple and scarlet colour, and decked with gold and precious stones and pearls, having a golden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication : and upon her forehead was a name written, MYSTERY, BABYLON THE GREAT, THE MOTHER OF HARLOTS AND ABOMINATIONS OF THE EARTH.
Page 47 - Ah Sir, my liege lord, and my love, Shall I accuse the hidden cruell fate. And mightie causes wrought in heaven above, Or the blind god, that doth me thus amate. For hoped love to winne me certaine hate? Yet thus perforce he bids me do, or die. Die is my dew ; yet rew my wretched state, You, whom my hard avenging destinie Hath made judge of my life or death indifferently. LII. "Your owne deare sake forst me at first to leave My fathers kingdom...
Page 5 - Except the God of my father, the God of Abraham, and the fear of Isaac, had been with me, surely thou hadst sent me away now empty. God hath seen mine affliction and the labour of my hands, and rebuked thee yesternight.
Page 145 - In them hath he set a tabernacle for the sun : which cometh forth as a bridegroom •out of his chamber, and rejoiceth as a giant to run his course.
Page 19 - To stay the steppe, ere forced to retrate. This is the wandring wood, this Errours den, A monster vile, whom God and man does hate : Therefore I read beware. Fly, fly (quoth then The fearefull Dwarfe) this is no place for living men.
Page 23 - Now now Sir knight, shew what ye bee, Add faith unto your force, and be not faint: Strangle her, els she sure will strangle thee. That when he heard, in great perplexitie, His gall did grate for griefe and high disdaine, And knitting all his force got one hand free, Wherewith he grypt her gorge with so great paine, That soone to loose her wicked bands did her constraine.

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