The Edinburgh magazine, or Literary miscellany

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Page 175 - I am patriot enough to take pains to bring this useful invention into fashion in England; and I should not fail to write to some of our doctors very particularly about it, if I knew any one of them that I thought had virtue enough to destroy such a considerable branch of their revenue for the good of mankind. But that distemper is too beneficial to them, not to expose to all their resentment the hardy wight that should undertake to put an end to it. Perhaps if I live to return, I may, however, have...
Page 219 - ... the Lord thy God chasteneth thee. Therefore thou shalt keep the commandments of the Lord thy God, to walk in his ways and to fear him. For the Lord thy God bringeth thee into a good land, a land of brooks of water, of fountains and depths that spring out of valleys and hills; a land of wheat and barley and vines and fig trees and pomegranates; a land of oil olive and honey...
Page 46 - I wish popularity : but it is that popularity, which follows, not that which is run after; it is that popularity which, sooner or later, never fails to do justice to the pursuit of noble ends, by noble means.
Page 220 - I have received the letter which your excellency did me the honour to write to me on the 12th of December, 1827, and laid it before the emperor.
Page 206 - The cheerful haunts of man ; to wield the axe And drive the wedge in yonder forest drear, From morn to eve his solitary task.
Page 46 - ... against allowing the defendant, upon this and every other question, not only the whole advantage he is entitled to from substantial law and justice, but every benefit from the most critical nicety of form, which any other defendant could claim under the like objection.' The only effect I feel, is an anxiety to be able to explain the grounds upon which we proceed, so as to satisfy all mankind, that a flaw of form given way to, in this case, could not have been got over in any other.
Page 349 - He arose, fresh as the morning, to his task : the silence of the night invited him to pursue it ; and he can truly say, that food and rest were not preferred before it. Every...
Page 364 - Turkish men, on the other hand,' continued he, ' have an aversion to Christianity equal to that which the Christian women have to the religion of Mohammed. Auricular confession is perfectly horrible to their imagination. No Turk, of any delicacy, would ever allow his wife, particularly if he had but one, to hold private conference with a man on any pretext whatever.
Page 45 - We cannot pardon. We are to say, what we take the law to be: if we do not speak our real opinions, We prevaricate with God and our own consciences.
Page 364 - A lady, to whom I was giving an account of it the day on which it happened, could with difficulty allow me to proceed thus far in my narrative ; but, interrupting me with impatience...

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