The Politics of Addiction: Medical Conflict and Drug Dependence in England Since the 1960s

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Palgrave Macmillan, Aug 20, 2012 - Science - 260 pages
Education and Gendered Citizenship in Pakistan challenges the uncritical use of the long held dictum of the development discourse that education empowers women. Situated in the poststructuralist feminist position, it argues that in its current state the educational discourse in Pakistan actually disempowers women. Through a systematic examination of the educational discourse in Pakistan, Naseem argues that the educational discourse (through curricula, textbooks, and pedagogical practices) constitutes gendered identities and positions them in a way that exacerbates and intensifies inequalities between men and women on one hand and between the dominant and minority groups on the other. Gendered constitution and positioning of subjects also regulates the relationship between the subjects and the state in a way that women and minorities are excluded from the development and citizenship realms. Finally, Naseem uncovers the mechanisms through which the educational discourse in Pakistan constitutes a militant nationalism and militaristic nationalistic subjects.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
A Background Sketch
6
The Treatment and Rehabilitation Report
26
3 Defining Good Clinical Practice
44
The General Medical Council and Dr Ann Dally
65
The Home Office Drugs Inspectorate
89
Three Professional Groups
117
7 Guidelines and the Licensing Question
147
Conclusion
167
Interviewed Doctors Professional Roles
181
Notes
183
Bibliography
223
Index
244
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

SARAH MARS is the Qualitative Project Director, Heroin Price and Purity Outcomes Study, at the University of San Francisco, California. She read history at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, UK, and received a PhD from the University of London. Since contributing to various drug policy reports, she has worked on the history of drugs, alcohol and tobacco at the University of California, San Francisco and London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.