Portnoy's Complaint

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Random House, 2002 - Fiction - 274 pages
53 Reviews
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Thrust through life by his unappeasable sexuality and at the same time held back by the iron grip of his childhood, Alexander Portnoy is one of Philip Roth's most intriguing and hilarious characters. A deliciously funny book, absurd and exuberant, wild and uproarious.--The New York Times.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - foof2you - LibraryThing

Interesting book about Alexander Portnoy and his complaint, actually should be, complaints. There are very many, his parents, religion, sex, his sex life all being told to his doctor. I would imagine ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - bjkelley - LibraryThing

274 pages that turn out to be a rant to a psychiatrist. I read this book a few pages at a time and really enjoyed it. I can't imagine sitting down and reading it in one fell swoop. Looking forward to seeing the movie now and seeing how they adapted the book to the screen. Read full review

Contents

I
3
II
17
III
37
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Philip Roth received the 1960 National Book Award in fiction for Goodbye, Columbus. He has twice received the National Book Critics Circle Award—in 1987 for the novel The Counterlife and in 1992 for Patrimony. Operation Shylock won the PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction and was chosen by Time magazine as the best American novel of 1993. In 1995, Roth's Sabbath's Theater received the National Book Award in fiction. In 1998, he received the Pulitzer Prize for American Pastoral and was a White House recipient of the National Medal of Arts. His other books include the trilogy and epilogue Zuckerman Bound; the novels Letting Go, My Life as a Man, and The Professor of Desire, the political satire Our Gang, and most recently The Human Stain.

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