Cato; Or, An Essay on Old Age, Volume 1

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R. Moncrieffe, 1774
 

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Page 111 - I am persuaded, have thus widely disseminated immortal spirits, and clothed them with human bodies, that there might be a race of intelligent creatures, not only to have dominion over this, our earth, but to contemplate the host of heaven, and imitate in their moral conduct the same beautiful order and uniformity so conspicuous in those splendid orbs.
Page 292 - The evils of this life appear like rocks and precipices, rugged and barren at a distance ; but at our nearer approach we find little fruitful spots, and refreshing springs, mixed with the harshness and deformities of nature.
Page 110 - Behold the child, by nature's kindly law, Pleased with a rattle, tickled with a straw : Some livelier plaything gives his youth delight, A little louder, but as empty quite...
Page 81 - O'er all the vegetable world command ? And the wild giants of the wood receive What law he's pleas'd to give ? He bids th...
Page 32 - ... they have entered into, or with whom they have had any pecuniary transactions. Innumerable instances of a strong memory in advanced years might be produced from among our celebrated lawyers, pontiffs, augurs, and philosophers; for the faculties of the mind will...
Page 269 - Warms in the sun, refreshes in the breeze, Glows in the stars, and blossoms in the trees : Lives through all life, extends through all extent, Spreads undivided, operates unspent...
Page 182 - The truth is, the human mind is never Jlationary : when it is not progreffive, it is necefiarily retrograde. He who imagines, at any period of his life, that he can advance no farther in moral, or intellectual improvements, is as little acquainted with the extent of his own powers, as the...
Page 118 - How can he exalt his thoughts to any thing great and noble, who only believes that, after a short turn on the stage of this world, he is to sink into oblivion, and to lose his consciousness for ever?
Page 120 - I am far from regretting that life was bestowed on me, as I have the satisfaction to think that I have employed it in such a manner as not to have lived in vain. In short, I consider this world as a place which Nature never designed for my permanent abode ; and I look upon my departure out of it, not as being driven from my habitation, but as leaving my inn. O glorious day ! when I shall retire from this low and sordid scene, to associate with the divine assembly of departed spirits...
Page 278 - All thefe with ceaflefs praife his works behold Both day and night : how often from the fteep Of echoing Hill or Thicket have we heard Celeftial voices to the midnight air, Sole, or refponfive each to others...

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