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VIZAGAPATAM AND WATTAIR.

CHAPTER XIX.

At last the day of our departure arrived. The

good brig Catharine, commanded by a brother of The season for the circuit-going judges at last the Captain of the Isadora, afforded us an opporarrived. My guardian and his wife and family left tunity of bidding farewell to the vilest station in by land for Rajahmundo, and other intermediate all India. A couple of days previous to our stations, arranging to meet us at Vizagapatam. departure we had been the guests of our poor By us, I mean myself and my cousin Tom, who Fort-Adjutant, as hospitable and good a soul as was then doing duty with the 29th N.I., but had ever breathed. His only failing was an extreme been recently posted to the 43rd, stationed at partiality to act as parson. Sunday after Sunday Berhampore. We remained nearly a fortnight would be read the Church Service, stumbling over after B.'s departure lords and masters of his house every long and difficult name in the Old Testament --and household goods. Being both youngsters, both painfully and ludicrously. The next tidings we and free from all restraint, I fear we rather flared had of him was, that he was added to the number up during this period. I am certain that B.'s wine of victims to the climate. cellar suffered materially. The weather was hot, On board of the good brig Catherine, 200 tons the dust choking; and Sauterne the very thing to register burden, coppered and copper-fastened, quench one's fiery thirst. Inde, we pitched into it well manned, equipped, tight and staunch, and in unmercifully, despite the remonstrances and mur- every way fitted to undertake the voyage in ques. murings of the faithful old butler, and we were tion,-luckily for us, this was so far correct, -I materially assisted in disposing of the fluid by had no sooner reached the deck, than I was regu. sundry thirsty subalterns, and that invulnerable, larly on my “beam ends ;" those old familiar unquenchable old sponge, “Dick" — vulgarly abominations of bilge water, tar, salt fish, onions, called old Dick—the Master-Attendant. I believe &c., floated upon the detestable atmosphere that I have before reverted to this eccentric old gentle- impregnated the ship, and I gave in witbout a man, who had outlived and proved the effects of struggle. Not so my other compagnons de voyage. forty Massulipatam hot seasons, till he was literally They held out manfully, gloated over fat salt pork, Sbrivelled up, and dried like a smoked herring, and pitched into the pickled onions, swallowed any impervious to the effects of the fiercest sun, or the amount of bottled porter, and swaggered abont the furnace breath of the hottest land winds. Full of decks, cigar in mouth, and apparently in the seventh anecdote, relative to past days and ancient heroes, heaven of enjoyment. Occasionally they paused to his proudest theme was to dwell upon the intimacy contemplate my prostrate form and suggest some that had existed between himself and Sir John palliative remedy for my sufferings : such, for inMalcolm. Like most men of the old school, he stance, as a small bit of fat pork, well fried in salad looked upon modern improvements with a suspicious oil; but my sufferings had already reached their and mistrustful eye.

I shall never forget the climax, and I was beyond the venom of the shafts excitement the old gentleman was thrown into by burled at me. My greatest and most moderate the arrival at Bombay of the “Bernice” steamer, torment was the old black steward, who, in a with the first regular overland mail. This route spirit of mistaken kindness kept continually worry. was then in its infancy, and as “Dick” was post- ing me to try some of his gams and gallies, (jams master as well as Master-Attendant, he looked upon and jellies) as he called them. Night closed in the innovation in the light almost of sacrilege. I over us, and, completely wearied out, I sunk into a believe he is still alive and hale. I almost believe peaceful slumber; from which, towards morning, I that death has forgotten the old man who has for was aroused by a tremendous tumult on deck. 80 many years braved the vile climate of Massuli. There was nobody in the cabin or the cuddy to patam.

reply to my inquiries; everyone had gone on deck,

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and the chances seemed to be that the vessel was cious maiden annt could have effected. The other going down in a hurricane, for I could distinctly officers attached to this invalid battalion were all hear it blowing up aloft. However, sea-sick broken down specimens of most deplorable bankpeople are great philosophers, and a termination ruptcy in body, mind, and purse. Not one but to my enfferings would, in any shape, have been stooped and shook with palsy, until wound up of a almost welcome. I am quite sure I was indiffer- morning, to a certain extent, by brandy and water, ent as to my fate—so much so that I coolly turned I may only except the Adjutant, who had risen round, and fell off fast asleep again.

from the ranks, and was, comparatively speaking, a When I next opened my eyes, it was broad day- perfect Hercules in health and pocket. These light; and, though the tempest roared loudly, still poor officers who had all entered the army with my attention was immediately arrested by the brilliant prospects of promotion and honours before groans and moaning of my two fellow passengers, them were, in many instances, regularly bullied who now, in just retribution for their mockery, out of their regiments. At that period the Madras were suffering from all the pangs of that dreadful army was very differently constituted from its sea ailment they had thought lightly of yesterday. present state, when the march of intellect has Strange to say (such alas is the vengeful spite of made rapil strides in India. At the time these frail mortals), this sight effectually cured me of all poor fellows joined, there was hardly a colonel or my own ills. Scrambling out of my berth, as best a major in the infantry that ever was guilty of I could for the rolling and pitching of the vessel, going to bed sober. Even some of the generals I succeeded in reaching a seat at the stern of the commanding districts have left an unenviable fame brig, where the fresh cool air, soon entirely re- and name for their drinking propensities. An vived me.

The sea was one mass of monstrous, anecdote is told of old general V., who nightly frothy waves, the wind howled fiercely through presided at the mess table of the regiments in the rigging; the lofty spars were all struck, and garrison, and as surely got stupidly intoxicated not an atom of canvass, save a double reefed before 11 p.m. The certain indication to the storm-staysail, exposed to the gale. It was blow- aides de camp of the approaching state of uncon. ing one of those terrible hurricanes which riodi- sciousness, was villainous effort the old man used cally visit the coast of Coromandel, aud commit to make in trying to sing one of Dibdin's famed such fearful devastation amongst the shipping. sea songs. This was the signal for the general to At that period, the storm was dead against us, and, be carried out, neck and heels, amidst the uproarious according to the ship's reckoning, we had drifted mirth of the youngsters. As the main road would considerably past Coringa, and were nearly opposite have proved a circuitous and tiring process, these Madras, in lieu of being exactly as far on the other reckless youths very coolly carried the general side of Massalipatam. There was something from hedge to bedge, and pitched him, cocked hat buoyant, however, and even cheerful in the vessel's and all, over every intervening ditch; the heavy motions, and the sun, though partially obscured, bump with which he fell, the groans which issued gave sufficient light to gild the froth-capped from his well-shaken frame, were nuts to his waves with a golden tinge. By breakfast time, I tormentors, and, strange to say, the old man was was as hungry as a hunter ; at dinner, as ravenous never the worse for these mad freaks the next day. as a wolf; and tea and supper re-assured me as to There was another queer old customer—a Bacchathe possibility of getting over the complaint. It nalian hypocrite—who passed under the sobriquet was now my turn to look in upon the sufferers, of Nosey B. Nosey always got sentimentally drunk and suggest mild remedies. As Sterne's Corporal about midnight, and then discussed philosophy and says, Chacun a son tour ; but, upon the whole, I temperance to the youngsters around him. drew it mildly. At sunset the wind died away “A glass of brandy and water, by Jove, sir, in for half an hour, and then blew with renewed moderation, by Jove, sir !--a cigar in moderation, energy from an exactly opposite direction. This sir !—these are (hiccup) the best thi-n-gs (another was a fair wind for us; we ran before it all night, hiccup) in the”—and here, exit the old humbug and, soon after daybreak, came to anchor off the under the table, whence he was duly hauled, and pretty looking town and fort of Vizagapatam. carefully shaken, by his palkee bearers, who carried

Soon after sunrise we landed, little loath to quit him home on their shoulders. With such examthe abominable odours and atmosphere of the ples before them, and the rascally facilities afforded trader. A couple of hired tonjons carried us in a by Indian baboos, and others, for incurring debt, very few moments into the fort, where, for the it was hardly to be wondered at that many a protime being, the Circuit Judge resided in a very mising lad of sixteen and seventeen, fresh from spacious and commodious house, which commanded school, and thrown suddenly into a life of indolence, an extensive prospect of the ramparts, the sea, and luxury, and almost entire independence, should shipping, and the parade ground, with the invalid have imperceptibly lost all the moral and requarters opposite. The fort was exclusively ligious sentiments imbued into him by sound Enggarrisoned by European invalids, commanded by lish educations, and sunk into vice, and too often Major P.-a bald-headed, prosy, old man, who was a course of dishonesty. I myself knew an Honourthe aversion of us youngsters, and got us into more able, the youngest son of an Earl, who, upon his scrapes by mischievous tittle-tattling than any vi- fair and honourable name, had borrowed immense

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sums from some of the more respectable natives. man to boot. Here was a talented, carefully Fancy what this noble youth's sentiments and reared man, perfectly lost, body and soul, through feelings must have been when the black fellow, the curse of evil example which-thank heaven! that he would hardly allow to sit in his presence, -no longer exists in India. from whom he borrowed at exhorbitant interest, My comrade's birthday happened to come, as but under the hallucination that it was he and not birthdays will, and S. and I determined to celethe lender that was doing the favour, - I say, brate the occasion by a regular blow out. imagine this sprig of a noble stock standing in The mess butler had to furnish the greg and open court, a prisoner for debt, and being told, as

necessary plates and dishes; the wines also came he was, hefore assembled blacks and whites, that from the mess, as did the two silver candlesticks. he was a dishonour to his honourable name! These Being bachelors, our own kit was certainly limited, were the very words the old baboo used; and as the central room of the bungalow constituted our revenge, or even one satisfactory kick, was out of dining-room, in the centre stood the table, at either the question, our dishonourable friend went back end our respective bedsteads, an empty six-dozen to prison, and took violently to brandy and water, chest, on either side, though rather hard, afforded and so went to the dogs.

capital seats; and, in addition to all this, we really Most of these poor invalid fellows at Vizag lad did own three chairs and a stool. The day at last been victimised early in their career ; very few arrived ; preparations had been completed to our had attained a captaincy; the greater part were entire satisfaction; the dessert was spread out lieutenants and ensigns, and as there is 110 pro- upon an old horse-cloth, which covered one of the motion in the invalid battalions, lientenants and window sills. A fearful array of bottles extended ensigns they were doomed to remain for life. Not

across the shady side of the verandah, and S. and possessed of equal powers of resistance, at a time I contemplated these preparations with sundry when the slack reins of military discipline began winks of satisfaction, and an inward presentiment to be lightened a little by Sir George Townsend of something good in store. The dinner hour fixed Walker, and successive commanders-in-chief

, was 6 p.m. We expected several fellows belonging whilst the old hands drank deep and late, but, to the Queen's ships, and some of the juniors of being well inured to such indulgencies, rose fresh our own place. As ill-luck would have it, old T. as a lark with the dawn, and went through their happened to have drawn his pay the very day vecessary duties, the youngsters, who followed before our party came off; and, as was his wont in their wake, fell victims to the example, and on these monthly occasions, he was seized with a being detected once, twice-perhaps a dozen times visiting mania, and having hired a palanquin made --unfit for drill, unfit for duty of any kind, re- a regular tour, taking every house in turn as he ceived a gentle hint from the commanding officer went along. A hospitable, but mistaken, practice to invalid, with the option of dismissal. Tender- exists in India of making every visitor swallov a hearted medicos furnished requisite certificates. couple of glasses of sherry and munch a biscuit or The gold lace and buttons, and the varied cuffs two; this is evidently derived from Oriental praeand collars, were substituted by silver and French tices, only that we have substituted wines and grey, and as the wretched man donned this livery spirits for the less intoxicating drink of the natives. of degradation, he sunk in his own esteem and that Ours was the thirty-fifth house old T. called at, and of his acquaintance, never to rise to the level he could go no further. On a rough calculation again. Alas ! this is no overdrawn picture; he bad swallowed some fifty glasses of wine, bebut remember I am speaking of 1838, just twenty sides ale, and this upon an empty stomach. The years ago. Wonderful and rapid improvements result was obvious, his visiting ended with us that have since taken place in all branches of the ser- day; he swallowed a glass of porter and immevice in India.

diately fell asleep in bis chair, where, in the course But to return to Vizagapatam.

Of all the ex- of an hour or so, he became the victim of a batch traordinary and singular characters assembled in of as thoughtless and rioting youngsters as were the fort, poor Mr. T. was undoubtedly the most ever collected under the same roof. The day was pitiable, and yet most grotesque. Never in the exceedingly hot, and the first thing that suggested memory of that respectable individual, the oldest itself was to cool the victim of our ruthless sport, inhabitant, had T. ever been convicted of going to the result was that some twenty bottles of saltbed sober, and he was then a lieutenant of sixty petre-cooled water, were deliberately poured over years of age, and upwards of forty years' standing the head of the sleeping bacchante; at last this His wife was a half-caste, and I believe, owned the aroused him into some sense of consciousness, and house they lived in, besides having some small a terrible grave young Dr. of the 44th, actually patrimony from gardens, which assisted con- persuaded the shivering and debilitated old man siderably in keeping the wolf from the door, that his sopping bead and garments were the results the more especially as poor T.'s propensities of a terrible outbreak of perspiration ; fearful, tended rather to expense than economy. How- however, that the game might be carried too far, ever, with the assistance of his own meagre pay, he I supplied him with a change of linen myself, managed to rub along, and during the forenoon with-inexpressibles. He accomplished the first was a most agreeable companion, and a clever change, but the second was too great an effort,

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getting one leg in he fell fast asleep again, and it ashamed to say we were forced ignominously to required our united effort to carry him into bed, retreat sans ceremonie ; sans slippers, and worst of which, however, we safely accomplished, leaving all, oh! ye fates, sans dinner, or anything in the him until the dinner hour arrived.

shape of food. Truly, that was a bad omen for We were all young and bachelors, and conse- poor S.'s birthday. Our bungalow was situated quently not over fastidious about our indoor on the summit of a hill, and we had some twenty costumes ; indeed, not to mince matters, they steps to ascend and descend from the verandah to usually consisted of shirt, drawers, straw hat and the gradually sloping hill. Down these, on that slippers ; in these we passed the day ; breakfasted, eventful night, in our hurry to be beyond the reach dined, and supped. Old T. had come in full dress, of T.'s cold steel, some half a dozen of us rolled in with swabs and sword complete, the latter un horrid confusiou, laughing, threatening, roaring, fortunately we left by his bedside. We smoked all at the same moment. Poor young S., the middy, our manillas in the open verandah, and drank pale endeavoured to bolt through the window, but T. sherry and water anxiously awaiting the hour of who caught sight of him, hurled the soup tureen six ; when mentally we calculated upon much at his bead, with such precise aim, that the fun and jollity in store. Six came at last, and so scalding contents nearly blinded him ; most sortudid the mosquitoes; but we had safe guards nately, beyond a slight cut, he had sustained no against the attacks of these villanous insects, from material injury. the fact of our clothes having been so made ex- We, however, who bad been ousted were placed pressly as to embrace feet and all. A few minutes in the most ludicrous and unenviable position. The later and our seafaring guests made their appear- night was pitch dark, and old T. in his valiant ance; there was M. the Scotch assistant-surgeon, desences had smashed every bit of crockery and S. the middy, G. the purser's clerk, and one or two glass, and hurled every bottle after us with alarmothers. The candles were lighted, our guests ingly correct aim. Whilst the darkness indoors divested themselves of all superfluous clothing; precluded the possibility of our watching his moveG. placed his silver watch on the table ; T. snored ments, he possessed the decided advantage of being peacefully, when, with a true spirit of loyalty we able to distinguish forms and figures as we glided commenced the evening, with a bumper to "the about in uncertainty, from the back to the front of Queen, God bless her;" followed by an odious the bungalow. On one occasion the alarm was attempt at

raised that the enemy (possessing all the cunning

of a lunatic, and if ever man was temporarily A bomper of Burgundy, fill, fill, to me.

insane, old Mr. T. was that night) was creeping Whether it was from our discordant howling, or the towards us, drawn sword in hand. Away we work of evil genius, or fate, or thirst, or ine started, helter-skelter, down the bill

, laughing upbriety, I really cannot assert, but one thing is cer. roariously, the while, at our absurd position. To tain, viz. that the sleeper awoke, and starting up add to the noise and turmoil of the scene, the into a sitting posture, insisted in joining in the two D.'s, brothers, having inadvertently stumbled toast. S. poured him out a bumper of Dublin against each other during our ignominous flight, stout, a rarity in India, and T. having swallowed got up a private quarrel amongst themselves, which half, roared out vociferously, “ God save the might have ended in a regular row, had not the Queen,” and capsized the remaining contents of alarm of the Philistine being upon us once more his glass over our only two candles, leaving us in put them to flight. utter darkness.

Cunning, with all his madness, T. found it safest Then ensued a scene and scrimmage, and to it to retire to the bungalow and keep a sharp look Hogarth could barely have done justice; the odo out to repel intruders. He had got the notion rous soup assailing our olfactory nerves had given into his addled brains, that our bungalow was his a spur to our already keen appetites; other dainty | private residence, and that he was only repelling dishes smoked upon the table; an awful pause of the attack of a parcel of freebooters, who had no seconds ensued, during which interval surprise business at all there. Many of us certainly were gave way to rage.

freebooters, in one sense of the word; for, having " What do you mean by that you scoundrel ?” lost our slippers in the hurry, we had neither asked little S. fiercely, at the same time adminis- stockings nor shoes to protect us from the sharp tering a no gentle cuff on the head of old T. who gravelly pebbles; this, moreover, was one cause of was labouring evidently under symptoms of in. T. being able to keep us so long at bay; the sanity.

ground all round and the inside of the bungalow Strike

me, an oflicer and a gentle were strewed with fragments of broken glass and man!" off flew the coverlids, out hopped old T., crockery, and, being without means of procuring a one leg duly encased, the other sans couverture, light, even with the utmost precaution, we could and before we could interfere he had unsheathed barely avoid treading upon the fragments. his sword and made a plunge in the dark, lest and After many councils of war, and when the night right. Our servants had gone back to the mess had waned into morning, we made a simultaneous room to fetch what had yet to be brought; not a attack on the front and back of the bungalow, match was to be had for love or money, and I am | resulting in the speedy capture of the offender,

me, sir!

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who was disarmed, secured, carefully lodged in a , the umbrageous foliage of stately banians and palanquin, and sent back to the bosom of his neg- tamarinds, whilst the whole air was perfamed lected family. This was the last we saw of him. with the roses and jessamine that grew in abunSome weeks later he took exclusively to cherry dance all over the place ; birds of fifty bright and brandy, and in a few months' time was carried to varied plumages fluttered from bough to bough, his last home.

and carolled pleasantly in the golden light of the Not far from the Fort at Vizagapatam, is a ma setting sun from the loftier branches of the state. nufactory of those beautiful porcupine quill work liest trees. In the centre was a large tank, with boxes, desks and baskets, for which this place has a jet d'eau perpetually in play, and the pleasant a wide reputation. In the fort also was the pow. sea breeze swept uninterruptedly over the hill sides der manufactory, and an infant school, supported and precipices, which lined the sea shore. by some missionaries. The latter was situated Sooriab himself was a tall, handsome man, the just behind our house, and gave us full scope at perfect beau ideal of a high caste Indian gentleall hours in the day of judging of the vocal capa. man; he spoke and wrote the English fluently

, cities of its infantile scholars, who sung squeaktiough he had never been out of India, and coningly, “I love little pussy, I like her coat so versed on all topics, political and general

, with warm," and similar lugubrious ditties, which em. ease and much good sound sense. , His great braced all branches of education, even mathema- hobby seemed to be clocks, and I have often been tics included.

bewildered and surprised at the perpetual hammer At Wattair resided all the aristocracy of the and tongs created by some couple of soore clocks, place, and thither, when the hot weather had set striking in all intonations and at all distances. in, we also repaired. About midway, between the Before entering his private reception room we had Fort and Wattair, was situated the residence and to pass through a series of ante-chambers, each extensive grounds of Goday Sooriab Precashar boasting of at least six clocks of various dimenRow, a native gentleman of birth and education, sions and patterns, but mostly of a costly nature. and who was possessed of many good qualities What with cuekoos and musical clocks, and giants that rendered bim a favourite with the English. with clubs, and little old men that darted out of Sooriab’s house was a perfect palace as to size and turrets, and careful old sentries that were nerer structure, and the magnificence and costliness of relieved; these clocks were the greatest conceis. the furniture. His grounds constituted a perfect able attraction to all the European children in the park, with a fine carriage drive through them, place, though by a wise precaution they were so which he had very liberally thrown open to the placed as to be beyond the mischief that might public. Here, of an evening, all the whites congre- otherwise have resulted from the prying propengated, and enjoyed their evening exercise under | sities of these juvenile visitors.

BROKEN MEMORIES.

Broken memories of many a heart
Woven into one.-Shelley.

THE SMUGGLER'S REVENGE: A SEA-SIDE YARN.

CHAPTER I.

possibilities," you will say—but all of which, FROM THE SEA-SIDE.

nevertheless, as is too often the case in sea-side

retirements, resolve themselves into a general A dreamer on a lonely shore, Strange thoughts but half defined were his,

lounging away of pleasant days till the time comes And there from restless Fancy's store,

when we must return to London, when we wonder He shaped those dreamiugs into this.-S---

how they can possibly have passed away so quickly SEPTEMBER—and out of London, breathing fresh and blame ourselves for having done so lite air, and once more seeing honest country-faces, worthy of recollection in them. ruddy as autumn apples, without that worn £s. d. The readers of this magazine no doubt hare by kind of expression which so painfully reminds us this time thought, judging from the non-appearance of Fleet-street. In short I am in -shire, by of “Broken Memories's last month, that their the sea-side, in a little cottage which I have all to author has become sick of his goose-quill altogether. myself, and which stands on a bluff headland away It is not so, however, dearest of readers. Il bealth from the town, with the sea moaning musically alone has prevented me from gossipping with you; some fifty feet down in the bay beneath my garden ill health alone has put a temporary stop to our railings. I have nothing to do but walk, bathe, friendship, which has jogged on so pleasantly, with smoke, and think. “A pretty extensive list of but one interruption, since January last. More

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