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TWENTIETH CENTURY TEXT-BOOKS

EDITED BY

A. F. NIGHTINGALE, PH.D., LL.D.
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS, COOK COUNTY, ILLINOIS

TWENTIETH CENTURY TEXTS

IN ENGLISH

EDITED WITH INTRODUCTIONS AND NOTES

Shakspere's Macbeth. JONES. 30 cents.
The Sir Roger de Coverley Papers. BAKER. 30 cents.
Macaulay's Essays on Milton and Addison. AITON.

25 cents. Macaulay's Essays on Addison and Johnson. AITON.

30 cents. Selections from Milton's Shorter Poems. NICHOLS.

25 cents. Dryden's Palamon and Arcite. MARSHALL. 25 cents. George Eliot's Silas Marner. COLBY and JONES.

30 cents. Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America.

CRANE. 30 cents. Coleridge's Rime of the Ancient Mariner. EDGAR.

25 cents. Shakspere's The Merchant of Venice. BAKER and

JONES. 30 cents. Tennyson's The Princess. BAKER. 25 cents. Scott's The Lady of the Lake. CHALMERS. 30 cents. Shakspere's Julius Cæsar, McDOUGAL. 35 cents. Scott's Ivanhoe. DRACASS. 60 cents. Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield. MAITLAND.

40 cents. Carlyle's Essay on Burns. DRACASS.

30 cents. Washington's Farewell Address and Webster's

First Bunker Hill Oration. SULLIVAN. 25 cents. Goldsmith's The Deserted Village and The Trav.

eller. DRURY. 30 cents. Tennyson's Idylls of the King. (In preparation.)

D. APPLETON AND COMPANY NEW YORK

CHICAGO

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WILLIAM HAMMOND MCDOUGAL

HEAD OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH, BELMONT SCHOOL

BELMONT, CALIFORNIA

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PUBLIC L'"ATY

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COPYRIGHT, 1904, BY

D. APPLETON AND COMPANY

PREFACE.

THE text of this edition of Julius Caesar varies from that of the First Folio only where the latter seems clearly to be corrupt. In the punctuation of the text some approach has been made toward modern usage.

The notes and other helps have been prepared with special reference to the requirements for entrance to the larger colleges, but they are not limited by such require

Effort has been made, in the Introduction, to give the student something of that sense of acquaintance with Shakspere, as a man, which gives the true lover of the poet a personal interest in the plays and therefore a readier appreciation of them. The student has been aided, also, to get the poet's points of view. For, as Mr. Dowden observes, “even Shakspere could not transcend himself”; he had his points of view, not all of which were on Parnassus. One of them was in the audience for which he wrote. Always mindful of the office receipts, the playwright habitually looked through the eyes of his Elizabethan playgoer, who, in turn, looked through the atmosphere of the times. It is desirable, therefore, to approach the reading of the play with a fresh sense of the conditions—within the playwright and without—that went to make it what it is.

A word may be said regarding the arrangement of this edition. In the Introduction has been given only such matter as will prepare for an interested and broadly appreciative first reading of the play, as a play. For such reading, the advice of Dr. Johnson is to "read on through

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