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22. Difference of Mens Discoveries depends upon the dif.

ferent Application of their Faculties.
23. Men must think and know for themselves.
24. Whence the Opinion of innate Principles.
25. Conclusion.

BOOK II.-CHAP. I. -P.70

OF IDRAS.

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Of Ideas in general.
Secr.
1. Idea is the object of Thinking.
2. All Ideas come from Sensation or Reflection.
3. The Objects of Sensation, one Source of Ideas.
4. The Operations of our Minds, the other source of

them.
s. All our Ideas are of the one or the other of these.
6. Observable in Children.
7. Men are differently furnished with these, according to

the different Objects they converse with.
8. Ideas of reflection later, because they need attention.
9. The Soul begins to have Ideas, when it begins to per-

ceive.
10. The Soul thinks not always for this wants Proofs.

It is not always conscious of it.
12. If a fleeping Man thinks without knowing it, the sleep-

ing and waking Man are two Persons.
13. Impollible to convince those that fleep without dream-

ing, that they think.
14. That Men dream without remembering it, in vain

urged.
15. Upon this Hypothesis, the thoughts of a sleeping Man

ought to be moft rational.
16. On this Hypothefis the Soul must have Ideas not de-

rived from Sensation or Reflection, of which there is

no Appearance.
17. If I think when I know it not, nobody else can kuow

it.
19. How knows any one that the Soul always thinks ?

For if it be not a felf-evident Proposition, it needs
Proof.

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19. That a man should be busy in thinking, and

retain it the next moment, very improbable-
20-24. No Ideas but from Sensation or Reflection,

if we observe children.
25. In the reception of simple Ideas, the Understand

most of all paflive.

CHAP. II.

Of Simple Ideas.
SECT.

1. Uncompounded Appearances.
2, 3. The Mind can neither make nar destroy there.

CHAP. III.

Of Ideas of one Senfe.
Sect.
1. As Colours of Seeing, Sounds of Hearing,
2. Few simple Ideas have Names.

CHAP. IV.

Of Solidily.
Secr.
1. We receive this Idea from Touch.
2. Solidity fills Space.
3. Diftinct from Space.
4. From Hardnefs.
5. On Solidity depends Impulse, Resistance, and Protru-

fion.
6. What it is.

CHAP, V.

of fimple Ideas by more than one S.nfs.

CHAP. V.

of simple Ideas of Reflection.
Szct.
1. Are the Operations of the Mind about its other Ideas?

22. Difference of Mens Discoveries depends upon the dif.

ferent Application of their Faculties.
23. Men must think and know for themselves.
24. Whence the Opinion of innate Principles.
25. Conclusion.

BOOK II.-CHAP. I. - P.70

OF IDRAS.

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Of Ideas in general.
Seer.
1. Idea is the object of Thinking.
2. All Ideas come from Sensation or Reflection.
3. The Objects of Sensation, one Source of Ideas.
4. The Operations of our Minds, the other Source of

them.
s. All our Ideas are of the one or the other of these.
6. Observable in Children.
7. Men are differently furnished with these, according to

the different Objects they converse with.
8. Ideas of reflection later, because they need attention.
9. The Soul begins to have Ideas, when it begins to per-

ceive.
10. The Soul thinks not always ; for this wants Proofs.
11. It is not always conscious of it.
12. If a sleeping Man thinks without knowing it, the sleep-

ing and waking Man are two Persons.
13. Impossible to convince those that sleep without dream-

ing, that they think.
14. That Men dream without remembering it, in van

urged.
15. Upon this Hypothesis, the thoughts of a sleeping Man

ought to be most rational.
16. On this Hypothesis the Soul must have Ideas not de-

rived from Sensation or Reflection, of which there is

no Appearance,
If I think when I know it not, nobody else can kyow

pow's any one that the Soul always thinks !

be not a self-evident Proposition, it needs

it.

19. That a man should be busy in thinking, and yet not

retain it the next moment, very improbable.
20-24. No Ideas but from Sensation or Reflection, evident,

if we observe children.
25. In the reception of fimple Ideas, the Understanding is

most of all passive.

CHAP. II.

Of Simple Ideas.
Sect.
1. Uncompounded Appearances.
2, 3. The Mind can neither make nor destroy them.

CHAP. III.

Of Ideas of one Sense.
SECT.
1. As Colours of Seeing, Sounds of Hearing,
2. Few simple Ideas have Names.

CHAP. IV.

Of Solidiiy.
Seet.
1. We receive this Ided from Touche
2. Solidity fills Space.
3. Diftinct from Space.
4. From Hardnefs.
5. On Solidity depends Impulfe, Resistance, and Protru.

fion.
6. What it is.

CHAP. V.

of fimple Ideas by more than one Sonje,

CHAP. VÌ.

Of fimple Ideas of Reflection.
Sacr.
1. Are the Operations of the Mind about its other Ideas.}
2. The Idea of Perception, and Idea of Willing, we have

from the Reflection.

CHAP. VII.

Of fimple Ideas, both of Sensation and Reflection,
Sect.
1-6. Pleasure and Pain.
7. Existence and Unity.
8. Power.
9. Succession.
10. Simple Ideas, the Materials of all our Knowledge

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Other confiderations concerning fimple Ideas.
Secr.

1-6. Positive Ideas from privative Causes.
7, 8. Ideas in the Mind, Qualities in Bodies.
9, 10. Primary and secondary Qualities.
11, 12. How primary Qualities produce their Ideas.
13, 14. How fecondary.
15-23. Ideas of primary Qualities, are resemblances; of

secondary, not.
24, 25. Reason of our millake in this.
26. Secondary Qualities twofold ; firtt, immediately per-

ceivable ; fecondly, mediately perceivable.

CHAP. IX.

Of Perception.
Secr.
s. It is the first simple Idea of Reflection.
2.4. Perception is only when the Mind receives the Im-

preffion.
5, 6. Children, though they have ideas in the Womb, have

none inpate.
Which Ideas firit, are not evident.

Ideas of Sensation often changed by the judgment.
Perception puts the Difference between Animals and

ferior beings.
eption the Inlet of Knowledge.

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