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" Whereas, were the capacities of our understandings well considered, the extent of our knowledge once discovered, and the horizon found which sets the bounds between the enlightened and dark parts of things; between what is and what is not comprehensible... "
The philosophy of necessity; or The law of consequences, as applicable to ... - Page 96
by Charles Bray - 1841
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The Arminian Magazine: Consisting of Extracts and Original Treatises on ...

John Wesley - Methodism
...between what is, and what is not comprehenfible by us, men would perhaps with lefs fcruple acquiefce in the avowed ignorance of the one, and employ their thoughts and drfcourfe.with more advantage and fatisfaftion in the other." 3. I think that point, " That we have...
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An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, Volume 1

John Locke - Knowledge, Theory of - 1796 - 459 pages
...between \vhat is, and what is not comprehenlible by ug } men would perhaps with lefs fcruple acqqiefce in the avowed ignorance of the one, and employ their thoughts and difcourfe with more advantage and fatisfa^tipn in the other. .8. Thus much I thought necefiary to...
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An Essay Concerning Human Understanding: With Thoughts on the Conduct of ...

John Locke - 1801 - 308 pages
...tween what is and what is not comprehenfiblc by us, men would perhaps, with lefs fcruple, acquiefce in the avowed ignorance of the one, and employ their thoughts and difcourfe with more advantage and fatisfattion in the other. $ 8. What Idea Jan ds far. THUS much I...
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An essay concerning human understanding; with Thoughts on the ..., Volume 1

John Locke - 1801
...tween what is and what is not comprehenfible by us, men would perhaps, with lefs fcruple, acquiefce in the avowed ignorance of the one, and employ their thoughts 'and difcourfe with more advantage and fatisfaction in the other. 8. What IdezJtanJsfer. THUS much I...
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An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, Volume 1

John Locke - Knowledge, Theory of - 1805 - 510 pages
...thereon, we need not to be troubled that some other things escape our knowledge. B 3 what what U, and what is not comprehensible by us; men would perhaps...with more advantage and satisfaction in the other. . 8. Thus much I thought necessary to tands for* 6a y concerning the occasion of this enquiry into...
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An essay concerning human understanding. To which are now added, i. An ...

John Locke - 1805
...sets the bounds between the enlightened and dark parts of things, 'between * -. B 3 what what is, and what is not comprehensible by us ; men would perhaps...with more advantage and satisfaction in the other. . 8. Thus much I thought necessary to What i ea - concernmrr the occasion of this enquiry stands...
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An essay concerning human understanding. Also extr. from the author's works ...

John Locke - 1815
...found, which sets the bounds between the enlightened and dark parts of things, between what is, and what is not, comprehensible by us; men would perhaps...with more advantage and satisfaction in the other. Thus much I thought necessary to say concerning .the occasion of this inquiry into human understanding...
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An essay concerning human understanding. Also, extr. from the author's works ...

John Locke - 1819
...things, between what is, and what is not comprehensible by us ; men would perhaps with less.scruple acquiesce in the avowed ignorance of the one, and...with more advantage and satisfaction in the other. . 8. What idea stands for. Thus much I have thought necessary to say concerning the occasion of this...
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Lectures on the Philosophy of the Human Mind, Volume 1

Thomas Brown - Philosophy - 1822
...found, which sets the bounds between the enlightened and dark parts of things, between what is and what is not comprehensible by us, men would perhaps,...with more advantage and satisfaction in the other."* These observations of Mr Locke illustrate, very happily, the importance of a right view of the limits...
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The Edinburgh Review: Or Critical Journal, Volume 99

Sydney Smith, Lord Francis Jeffrey Jeffrey, Macvey Napier, William Empson, Sir George Cornewall Lewis, Arthur Ralph Douglas Elliot (Hon.), Henry Reeve, Harold Cox - 1854
...which sets ' the bounds between the enlightened and dark parts of things, ' — between what is and what is not comprehensible by us, — ' men would,...' ignorance of the one, and employ their thoughts with more ' advantage and satisfaction in the other.' Happy had all philosophers acted on such maxims...
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