Rhymes for the Nursery

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Harvey and Darton, 1824 - Children's poetry, English - 96 pages
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Page 10 - TWINKLE, twinkle, little star, How I wonder what you are, Up above the world so high, Like a diamond in the sky.
Page 91 - And he said, Little cousin, can you tell me why You are loved so much better by people than I ? My back shines as bright and as yellow as gold, And my shape is most elegant, too, to behold ; Yet nobody likes me for that, I am told.
Page 61 - I'm griev'd to see, That you can so ill-temper'd be: You make your fault a great deal worse, By being angry and perverse. O, how much better it appears To see you melting into tears, And then to hear you humbly say, "I'll not do so another day.
Page 18 - Pull off their warm clothing, or give us their hides, That we may have plenty to wear. Then as the poor creatures are suffered to give So much for the comfort of man, I think 'tis but right, that as long as they live We should do all for them that we can.
Page 21 - A.11 your leaves do open wide, Every morning when on high The noble sun begins to ride. This is why, my lady fair, If you would the reason know, For betimes the pleasant air Very cheerfully doth blow. And the birds on every tree, Sing a merry, merry tune. And the busy honey-bee Comes to suck my sugar soon. This is all the reason why I my little leaves undo: Lady, lady, wake and try If I have not told you true.
Page 88 - ... road, And seeing his neighbour in want, Came up and assisted him in with his load ; For he was a good-natured Ant. Let all who this story may happen to hear, Endeavour to profit by it ; For often it happens that children appear As cross as the Ant every bit. And the good-natured Ant, who assisted his brother, May teach those who choose to be taught, That if little insects are kind to each other, Then children most certainly ought.
Page 46 - HAT ! go to see the kittens drowned, On purpose, in the yard ! I did not think there could be found A little heart so hard. Poor kittens ! no more pretty play With Pussy's wagging tail : Oh ! I'd go far enough away, Before I'd see the pail.
Page 74 - Tis true, now and then, he has got a bad trick Of standing stock still, tho' he never will kick; And then, poor old fellow, you know he can't tell That standing stock still is not using me well; For it never comes into his head, I dare say, To do his work first, and then afterwards play.
Page 41 - WHY, here's a foolish little man, Laugh at him, donkey, if you can ; And cat, and dog, and cow, and calf, Come, every one of you, and laugh : For, only think, he runs away If honest donkey does but bray ! And when the bull begins to bellow, He's like a crazy little fellow. Poor Brindle cow can hardly pass Along the hedge, to nip the grass, Or wag her tail to lash the flies, But off he runs, and out he cries ! And when old Tray comes jumping too, With bow, wow, wow...
Page 72 - And hiť legs are so thin you may almost see the bones, As he goes shiver, shiver, all along on the stones. He was once a negro boy, and a merry boy was he, Playing outlandish plays, by the tall palmtree, Or bathing in the river like a brisk water-rat, And at night sleeping sound on a little piece of mat. But there came some wicked people, and they stole him far away, And then...

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