Revolutionary Britannia?: Reflections on the Threat of Revolution in Britain, 1789-1848

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Manchester University Press, 2000 - History - 214 pages
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Europe was swept by revolution in the period from 1789 to 1848. Britain, alone of the major western powers, seemed exempt from this revolutionary fervour. The governing class attributed this exemption to divine providence and the soundness of the British Constitution. This view has been upheld by historians for over a century. This book provides students with an alternative view of the potential for revolution and the resources of conservatism in early industrial Britain which challenges many of the common assumptions. Incorporates quotations from primary sources to give the reader a critical sense of why revolution was taken seriously by people at the time. Shows how the revolutionaries were defeated by the government's propaganda against revolutionary sentiments and the strength of popular conservatism.
 

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Contents

Sedition and treason 17921820
13
Revolution or reform 183032
67
Chartism 18378
92
Why was there no revolution?
139
The cohesion of social welfare
158
The authority of the law
172
Conclusion
189
Index
204
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About the author (2000)


Edward Royle is Professor of History at the University of York

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