Memoirs of the Private and Public Life of William Penn, Volume 2

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Page 153 - His death and passion: and grant, that the grace of God, which bringeth salvation, may effectually teach and persuade me to deny ungodliness and worldly lusts, and to live soberly, righteously, and godly in this present world...
Page 420 - BECAUSE no People can be truly happy, though under the greatest Enjoyment of Civil Liberties, if abridged of the Freedom of their Consciences, as to their Religious Profession and Worship: And Almighty God being the only Lord of Conscience, Father of Lights and Spirits; and the Author as well as Object of all divine Knowledge, Faith and Worship, who only doth enlighten the Minds, and persuade and convince the Understandings of People, I do hereby grant and declare.
Page 355 - He had such an opinion of his own faculty of persuading, that he thought none could stand before it : though he was singular in that opinion ; for he had a tedious luscious way, that was not apt to overcome a man's reason, though it might tire his patience.
Page 337 - Nevertheless, no insanity or lunacy at all appeared in his actions ; and his mind was in an innocent state, as appeared by his very loving deportment to all that came near him. And that he had still a good sense of truth, is plain by some very clear sentences he spoke in the life and power of truth in an evening meeting we had together there, wherein we were greatly comforted...
Page 437 - That no man shall, by any ways or means, in word or deed, affront or wrong any Indian but he shall incur the same penalty of the law as if he had committed it against his fellow planter...
Page 421 - I do hereby grant and declare that no person or persons, inhabiting in this province or territories, who shall confess and acknowledge one Almighty God, the Creator, Upholder and Ruler of the world...
Page 169 - I sent for his brother, that he might kiss him too, which he did. All were in tears about him. Turning his head to me, he said, softly, 'Dear father! hast thou no hope for me ?' I answered, ' My dear child ! I am afraid to hope, and I dare not despair, but am and have been resigned, though one of the hardest lessons I ever learned.
Page 27 - Protestancy of the kingdom, and the ancient rights of the Government : for, to say truth, the one cannot be maintained without the other.
Page 328 - ... have been so clamorous and causelessly discontented to a true but smarting sense of their duty. I write not this with a design to include all : I doubt not many of you have been burdened at, and can by no means join in, the measures that have been taken ; but, while such things appear under the name of an Assembly, that ought to represent the whole, I cannot but speak more generally than I would desire, though I am not insensible what methods may be used to obtain the weight of such a name. "...
Page 462 - Two of these victims were men who, in the simple language of the narrator, " used to go to their labour without any weapons, and trusted- to the Almighty, and depended on his providence to protect them, (it being their principle not to use weapons of war to offend others, or to defend themselves ;) but a spirit of distrust taking place in their minds, they took weapons of war to defend themselves, and the Indians who had seen them several times without them and let them alone, saying they were peaceable...

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