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A (1) The Needle which has a hole in the end of it marked L, where the end of the spring marked G must be introduced, the ligature to be put through the hole marked D on the outside of the Needle ; the same end of the ligature must be again put through that end of the hole marked F, where the hole in the spring will come, which will make the ligature lie on the outside of the Needle, as in the plate. You nust particularly observe that the spring is to be pushed quite home to the shoulder near the eye, then introduce the Needle thus theaded under the Artery, and next take the second part of the instrument marked (2) and lead it down into the joint B till it drops into the screw. Then

press the finger on the rough part of the instrument marked I, when the point marked M will be found to catch hold of the eye of the spring to which the thread is attached.

Take hold, with the finger and thumb, of that part of the Instrument marked K, and press it downwards, which process will be found to draw out the spring and with it the ligature. When the spring and ligature are drawn out, the best way to clear the one from the other is to cut the ligature away at both ends from the instrument. In order to free the spring from the second part of the instrument after the operation, it will be necessary to pull them not directly one from the other, but to give the instrument a half turn to the right in dislodging it from the spring.

New Broad Street, January 18, 1923.

Sir,

I think it due to your ingenuity to inform you that I yesterday applied a ligature twice to the Subclavian Artery above the Clavicle with your Aneurism Needle, and found its application easy and entirely satisfactory in each instance. Whatever be the result of the Operation, which unforeseen and difficult circumstances render very doubtful, I feel it my duty to state that your Needle removes a difficulty which every operating Surgeon has complained of in his attempts to noose the deep seated Arteries, and that I should be at a loss to name any modern example of the application of a mechanical contrivance to Surgical purposes, so happy in point of simplicity and effect, or so promising in point of usefulness.

I am, Sir,
Yours obediently,

B. TRAVERS.
Surgeon to St. Thomas's Hospital.

To Mr. Weiss.

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Patron,
HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS THE DUKE OF SUSSEX.

LIST OF OFFICERS.

President,
JOHN LATHAM, M.D.

Ulice-Presidents:
HENRY CLINE, Esq. A. TEGART, Esq.
Sir A. COOPER, Bart. R. WALKER, Esq.
JOHN ABERNÉTHY, Esq. I E. A. BRANDE, Esq.

JOHN HULL, M.D.
Sir H. HalFORI), Bart.
Sir M. TIERNEY, Bart.

Dirtctors:
Physicians.

Surgeons.

Apothecaries.
T. COOKE, M.D.

W. NORRIS, Esq. W. MALIM, Esq.
P. M. LATHAM, M.D. G. F. LOCKLEY, Esq. H. ROBINSON, Esq.
ROBERT BREE, M.D.

H. L. THOMAS, Esq. E. BROWNE, Esq.
G. M, BURROWS, M.D.
J. HAYES, Esq.

NEVILLE WELLS, Esg, i
G. G. CURREY, M.D. MARTIN WARE, Esq. R. SIMMONS, Esq.
T. TURNER, M.D.

E. STANLEY, Esq. JOHN HUNTER, Esq.

Trustees :
JOHN LATHAN, M.D.

1

John BAYFORD, Esq.
HENRY CLINE, Esq.

RICHARD OGLE, Esq.

Treasurers:
R. CLUTTERBUCK, M.D. New Bridge-street.
HENRY FIELD, Esq. Christ's Hospital.
RICHARD OGLE, Esq. Great Russell-street, Bloomsbury.

Secretary, Mr. H. C. FIELD, 95, Newgate-street.
Solicitor,-CHARLES MURRAY, Esq. 13, John-street, Bedford row.
Collector,-Mr. Thomas Upton, Cheltenham Depot, Throgmorton-street.
Bankers,--Messrs. CHILDS, Temple Bar.

Subscriptions and Benefactions are received by the Treasurers, the Secrelary,

the Collector, and the Bankers.

PREFACE. .

The Medical BENEVOLENT Society is founded for the relief of those Members who are in distressed circumstances from mental or bodily infirmity, or who, from other causes, shall be considered as requiring and deserving of assistance, (provided they shall have been Subscribers for ten years); for which purpose u Fund has been formed.

When the objects of the Society are well understood, it cannot be doubted but that the less afluent of the Medical Profession will feel it prudent to uppropriate a trifle from their annual incomes, to secure to themselves an addition to their comforts when age or infirmities shall have overtakere them; and that those also, who feel themselves happily raised above such contingencies, will not hesitate to contribute towards alleviating those casual misfortunes which too frequently oppress their less fortunate Brethren.

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