Where the Sea Meets the Land: Artists on the Coast in Nineteenth-century Britain

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Sansom, 2007 - Art - 216 pages
The coastline of Great Britain was a powerful magnet for artists in the nineteenth-century. Its strong light created ideal conditions for experiments in open-air sketching and photography, and the difficulties of painting the endlessly moving waves presented a constant challenge. It also occupied a crucial place in imortant debates of the time. Napoleon's planned invasion in the early years of the century focused attention on the coast as a defensive boundary. Coastal geology and marine biology provided much of the evidence used in thedisputes over theories of evolution which led to the publication of Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species in 1859. Meanwhile the British invention of the seaside holiday gradually worked its way down the social scale. The author explores artists' responses to the coast and looks at the different ways politicians, tourists, theologians, poets and scientists would have viewd the coast. She shows how the images fit into the wider responses to social change and the

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Contents

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
6
THE POETRY OF THE SEA
21
THE BREAKERS AND THE SKY
41
Copyright

6 other sections not shown

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About the author (2007)

Christiana Payne is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of History of Art at Oxford Brookes University.

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