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9. ? Fairy

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موزر ، لي : ری رزرگ

WI) - Philomel, with melody,
Sing in your sweet lullaby ;

in B2B 107
Lulla, lulla, lullaby; lulla, lulla, lullaby:
Never harm, nór spell nor charm,
Come our lovely Lady nigh;

T!! Comorod vil
So good night, with lullaby od wat od

(19) it giyd 0981

oil pot gavl 101 Weaving spiders come not here ;.14 Hence, you long-leg'd spinners, hence : 107

Beetles black, approach not near, 11 55*** tits Worm, nor snail, do no offence. 14!?! Juk Philomel, with melody, &c. nitty9513:15

i Fairy Hence, away; now all is well: Ed1610 One, aloof, stand centinel.

[Exeunt Fairies. The Queen skeps,

Enter Oberon.
Ob. What thou feeft, when thou doft wake,

thy true love take;
Have and languish for his fake;
Be it ounce, or cat, or bear,
Pard, or boar with bristled hair,

Sun 15
In thy eye that fall appear,

-9909 wir Vio When thou wak't, it is thy dear; Wake, when some vile thing is near. [Exit Oberon.

Enter Lyfander and Hermia. *Luf. Fair love, you faint with wandring in the wood; And, to speak oroth, I have forgot our way "We'll reft us, Hermia, if you think it good,

gulerin And tarry for the comfort of the day

Her. Be't so, Lyander ; find you out a bed,
Far I upon this bank will rest

my

heada
Lyfi One turf shall serve as pillow for us both,
One heart, one bed, two bosoms, and one troth,

Her. Nay, good Lysander ; for my fake, my dear,
Lie further off yet, do not lie fo near.

Lys

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Ly. O take the sense, sweet, of my conference; (13) Love takes the meanings in love's innocence; I mean, that my heart unto yours is knitsi i So that but one heart çan you make of it :o) Two bosoms, interchained with an oath santo', So then two bosoms, and a single troch

13

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Then, by your side no bed-room me deny;
For lying fo, Hermia, I do not lye.

Her. Lyfander riddles very prettily';11'},
Now much beshrews my manners, and my pride,
I Hermia meant to say, Lyfander ly’d.
But, gentle friend, for love and courtesy
Lie further off; in human modesty,
Sach feparation, as, may well be said,
Becomes a virtuous bachelor and a maid ;
So far be diftant; and good night, sweet frierid ;
Thy love ne'er alter, 'till thy sweet life enu!

Lyf. Amen, amen, to that fair prayer, say i;
And then end life, when I end loyalty !
Here is my bed ; sleep give thee all his reft!
Her. With half that wish, the wilher's eyes be prest!"

[They fidep. Enter Puck, Puck. Through the forest have I gone, But Athenian found I none, On whofe eyes I might approve This flower's force in ftirring love : (13) O take the fine, fweet, of my innocence;

Love takes ibe meaning in love's conference.] 'Tis plain he eg that the players, for the sake of the jingle between fenfe and innocence, transposid the two last words in the two lines, and so made unintelligible nonsense of them. Let us adjust them, and this will be the meaning. When the interpreted his words to an evil.means ing, he says, o, take the sense of my conference ; i. e. judge of my meaning by the drift of the other part of my discourse, and let that interpret this. A very proper rule to be always observ'd, when we would judge of any one's meaning: the want of which is the most common cause of misinterpretation. He goes on and says, Lou takes *the meaning in love's innocence. s. e. The innocence of your love may teach you to discover mine.' Another very fine sentiment. So that these two most beautiful lines were perfectly disfigurd in the auk ward tranfpofition.

Mr, Warburtout

Night

E. 3.

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And ro the line is reduced to the uncomm the other. But this 102! A Midsummer Night's Dream. Night and filence I who is here

7., one Weeds of Athens he doth wear;

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0ths?:
'This is he, my mafter faid, soos' so'ng is estivery
Despised the Athenian maid. mitos17 1:Chile
And here the maiden sleeping round
On the dank and dirty ground," 1991/7!'
Pretty foul ! Me durft not lies a l' y* 31230111 jedl
Near to this kill-curtesy: (14) 05 de sus ( 21 9790W
Churl, upon thy eyes I throw qrt 29.11'1 pv al
All the pow'r this charm doth owe :
When thout wak'ft, let love forbidiin!
Sleep his seat on thy eye-lid;

hufis*. Io4 So awake, when I am gone ::

1389400) 11 For ( must now to Oberon.

y luegein
Enter Demetrius and Helena running. liin ocio
Hel. Stay, tho' thou kill me, fweet Demetrius h i 90 T
Dem. I charge thee, hence, and do not haunt me thusa
Hel. 0, wilt thou darkling leave met do not fou. T
Dem. Stay, on thy peril, i alone will go,

. [Exit Demetrius.
Hel. O, I am out of breath in this fond obade ng A
The more my prayer, the leffer is my grace. -Lsyl boA
Happy is Hermia, wherefoe'er the lies ; --290ta'svou.
For she hath bleffed, and attractive, eyes. 37 W !!
How came her eyes so bright?:not with falt tears sint
If so, my eyes are oftener walh'd than hers :rg:00 1:1
No, no, I am as ugly as a bear;
For beasts, that meet me, run away for fear, 9719
Therefore no marvel, tho? Demetrius, i in nov sud
Do (as a monster) fly my presence thus. z. 719*: 1000
What wicked, and diffembling, glass of mine!
Made me compare with Hermia's sphery eyne?-

(14) Near to this Jack-love, this kill-curtefv.} Thus, in all the printed editions. But this verse, 'as Ben Jobrfon says, is broke loose from his fellows, and wants to be tied up. I believe, the Poet wrotej

Near to this kill.coxrtefy,

ing somewhat and opinion, officiously clap'd'ia the other, as a comment ; and to it has ever fince held poresion : mro.

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But who is here? Lysander on the ground:, 7 be
Dead or asleep? I fee no blood, no wound: to
Lysander, if you live, good Sit, awake.
Lys. And run thro' fire I will, for thy sweet sake. La

[Wakings-
Transparent Helen, nature here shews art,
That through thy bofom makes me fe thy heart. 4'3.
Where is Demetrius ? Oh, how fit a wordt
Is that vile name, to perish on my sword !

Hel. Do not say fo, Lyfander, fay not lo;
What tho' he love your Hermia. Lord, what tho'?
Yet Ilermia still loves you;. then be content,

Lyf. Content with Hermia? no: I do repant
The tedious minutes I with her have spent si
Not Hermia, but Helena I love:

1
Who will not change a raven for a dove?.*)
The will of man is by his reason (way'd;
And reason fays, you are the worthier maid.
Things, growing, are not ripe until their seafon ;
So I, being young, 'till now ripe not to reason ;
And, touching now the point of human skill,
Reason becomes the marshal to my will,
And leads me to your eyes s where I o'erlook
Love's stories, written in love's richest book,

Hel. Wherefore was I to this keen močk’ry born?
When at your hands did I deserve this scorh :"
Iš’t not enough, is’t 'not enough, young man,
That I did never, no, nor never can,
Deserve a fweet look from Demetrius'

eye, ,
But you must flout my insuficiency !!!.. 19.
Good troth, you do me wrong; good footh, you-da;
In such disdainful manner me to woo:5
But fare you well. Perforce I must confess, IL 9.61X
I thought you Lord of more true gentleness:

AT Oh, that a Lady, of one man refus’d, Should of another therefore be abus'd! [Exit. Lyl: She sees no: Herma; Hermia, fleep thou there;

dia SA And n¢ver may'lt thou come Lyfander near; For as a furféit of the iweetelt things

iis, oign The deepest loathing to the stomach brings >>

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Or as thecheresies, that men do leave,
Are hated most of those ihey did deceive;
So thou, my surfeit and my heresy,
Of all be hated, but the most of me!
And all my pow'rs address your love and might
To honour Helen, and to be her knight. [Exit.

Her. Help me, Lyfander, help me! do thy best
To plack this crawling Serpent from my breaft:
Ay me, for pity, what a dream was here?
Lysander, look, how I do quake with fear;
Me-thought, a serpent eat my heart away;
And you fat smiling at his cruel prey :
Lylander! what remov'd . Lyfander, Lord!
What, out of hearing gones no found, no word ?
Alack, where are you? speak, and if you hear,
Speak, of all loves; (I swoon almost, with fear.)
No!- then I well perceive, you are not nigh;
Or death, or you, I'll find immediately. [Exit.
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A CT. HI:

SCENE, the Woodi
Enter Quince, Snug, Bottom, Flute, Snout, and

Starveling
son The Qeeen of Fairies lying asleep.

В оттом.
RE we all met?

Alle Datapat; and here's a marvellons con

venient place for our rehearsal. This green plot shall be our stage, this hauthorn-brake our tyring house, and we will do it in action, as we will do it before the Duke,

Bot. Peter Quince,

Quin. What say'st thou, bully Bottom ?
Bot. There are things in this comedy of Pyramus and
Thisby, that will never please. First, Pyramus must

draw

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