An Historical Memoir of the Colony of New Plymouth: From the Flight of the Pilgrims Into Holland in the Year 1608, to the Union of that Colony with Massachusetts in 1692, Volume 2

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Page 1 - Company, and their successors for ever, to be holden of us, our heirs and successors, as of our manor of East Greenwich, in our County of Kent, in free and common soccage, and not in capite...
Page 24 - 2. I am willing, and do promise to pay unto the government of Plymouth, one hundred pounds in such things as I have ; but I would entreat the favor that I might have three years to pay it in, forasmuch as 1 cannot do it at present. ' 3. I do promise to send unto the governor or whom he shall appoint, five wolves...
Page 159 - Lord filled their afflicted minds with such comforts as everyone cannot understand, and in the end brought them to their desired haven, where the people came flocking, admiring their deliverance; the storm having been so long and sore, in which much hurt had been done, as the master's friends related unto him in their congratulations. But to return to the others where we left. The rest of the...
Page 159 - But pitiful it was to see the heavy case of these poor women in this distress; what weeping and crying on every side, some for their husbands that were carried away in the ship...
Page 159 - ... go with their husbands, seemed to be unreasonable and all would cry out of them. And to send them home again was as difficult; for they alleged, as the truth was, they had no homes to go to, for they had either sold or otherwise disposed of their houses and livings. To be short, after they had been thus turmoiled a good while and conveyed from one constable to another, they were glad to be rid of them in the end upon any terms, for all were wearied and tired with them. Though in the meantime...
Page 159 - ... and children, with the goods, were sent to the place in a small bark, which they had hired for that end, and the men were to meet them by land ; but it so fell out, that they were there a day before the ship came, and the sea being rough and the women very sick, prevailed with the seamen to put into a creek hard by, where they lay on ground at low water. The next morning the ship came, but they were fast and could not stir till about noon.
Page 159 - But after the first boatful was got aboard, and she was ready to go for more, the master espied a great company (both horse and foot), with bills, and guns, and other weapons (for the country was raised to take them).
Page 158 - ... of their money, books and much other goods, they were presented to the magistrates, and messengers sent to inform the Lords of the Council of them; and so they were committed to ward. Indeed the magistrates used them courteously and showed them what favour they could; but could not deliver them till order came from the Council table.
Page 189 - Cron. 24. 4, doth sway much with me, in the case under consideration. I hope God will direct those whom it doth concern to a good issue. Let us join our prayers at the throne of grace with all our might, that the Lord would so...
Page 87 - Councils that effectual care be taken that the soldiers sent on this expedition be men of strength, courage, and activity ; their arms well fixed, and fit for service ; that their clothing be in all respects strong and warm, suitable for the season ; that they have provisions in their knapsacks for a week's march from their rendezvous, and supply in a magazine appointed for a more general service ; also, that there be a meet number of able ministers and chirurgeons provided and appointed for the...

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