The Works of Francis Bacon: Baron of Verulam, Viscount St. Albans, and Lord High Chancellor of England, Volume 3

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Page 483 - Now if there be such a tacit league or confederation, sure it is not idle ; it is against somewhat, or somebody: who should they be? Is it against wild beasts ; or the elements of fire and water? No, it is against such routs and shoals of people, as have utterly degenerated from the laws of nature ; as have in their very body and frame of estate a monstrosity ; and may be truly accounted, according to the examples we have formerly recited, common enemies and grievances of mankind ; or disgraces and...
Page 129 - ... declaration of the practices and treasons attempted and committed by Robert, late Earl of Essex, and his complices...
Page 218 - Whereupon I replied to that allotment, and said to their lordships, That it was an old matter, and had no manner of coherence with the rest of the charge, being matters of Ireland : and, therefore, that I having been wronged by bruits before, this would expose me to them more ; and it would be said I gave in evidence mine own tales.
Page 515 - Sampson, that killed more men at his death, than he had done in the time of all his life. This ship...
Page 430 - By no means," said Sir Francis, in a letter of advice addressed to the young courtier, "by no means be you persuaded to interpose yourself, either by word or letter, in any cause depending in any court of justice, nor suffer any great man to do it where you can hinder it.
Page 207 - My lord, on the other side, had a settled opinion, that the queen could be brought to nothing but by a kind of necessity and authority ; and I well remember, when by violent courses at any time he had got his will, he would ask me, " Now, Sir, whose principles be true?
Page 154 - Keeper told the earl of Essex, that they were sent from her majesty to understand the cause of this their assembly, and to let them know, that if they had any particular cause of grief against any persons whatsoever, it should be heard, and they should have justice.
Page 299 - England, having Scotland united, Ireland reduced, the sea provinces of the Low Countries contracted, and shipping maintained, is one of the greatest monarchies, in forces truly esteemed, that hath been in the world.
Page 423 - ... [Remember well the great trust you have undertaken; you are as a continual sentinel, always to stand upon your watch to give him true intelligence. If you flatter him, you betray him; if you conceal the truth of those things from him which concern his justice or his honour, although cot the safety of his person, you are as dangerous a traitor to his state, as he that riseth in arms against him.
Page 200 - And although it be true, that, as we all protested in our examinations and arraignments, we never resolved of doing hurt to her majesty's person, for in none of our consultations was there set down any such purpose; yet, I knew, and must confess, if we had failed of our ends, we should, rather than have been disappointed, even have drawn blood from herself.

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