Institutional Ethnography: A Sociology for People

Front Cover
Rowman Altamira, 2005 - Social Science - 257 pages
Prominent sociologist Dorothy Smith outlines a method of inquiry that uses everyday experience as a lens to examine social relations and social institutions. Concerned with articulating an inclusive sociology that goes beyond looking at a particular group of people from the detached viewpoint of the researcher, this is a method of inquiry for people, incorporating the expert's research and language into everyday experience to examine social relations and institutions. The book begins by examining the foundations of institutional ethnography in women's movements, differentiating it from other related sociologies; the second part offers an ontology of the social; and the third illustrates this ontology through an array of institutional ethnography examples. This will be a foundational text for classes in sociology, ethnography, and women's studies.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Making a Sociology for People
5
Womens Standpoint Embodied Knowing versus the Ruling Relations
7
Womens Standpoint and the Ruling Relations
9
The Historical Trajectory of Gender and the Ruling Relations
13
Knowing the Social An Alternative Design
27
Reorganizing the Social Relations of Objectivity
28
What Is Institutional Ethnography? Some Contrasts
29
An Alternative Understanding of Experience as Dialogue
127
Experience Language and Social Organization
128
The Data Dialogues
135
Conclusion
142
Work Knowledges
145
Work Knowledge as the Institutional Ethnographers Data
150
Work Knowledge
151
The Problem of Institutional Capture
155

Experience and the Ethnographic Problematic
38
Conclusion
43
An Ontology of the Social
47
Designing an Ontology for Institutional Ethnography
49
An Ontology of the Social
51
Institutions Language and Texts
68
Conclusion
69
Language as Coordinating Subjectivities
75
Reconceptualizing Language as Social
76
Experiential and TextBased Territories
86
Conclusion
94
Making Institutions Ethnographically Accessible
99
Texts TextReader Conversations and Institutional Discourse
101
The Text Reader Conversation
104
The Text Reader Conversations of Institutional Discourse
111
Texts as Institutional Coordinators
118
Conclusion
119
Experience as Dialogue and Data
123
The Problem
124
Assembling and Mapping Work Knowledges
157
Conclusion
161
Texts and Institutions
165
How Texts Coordinate
170
Conclusion
180
Power Language and Institutions
183
Making Institutional Realities
187
Regulatory Frames
191
Conclusion
199
Conclusion
203
Where Weve Got To and Where We Can Go
205
Expansion
212
The Collective Work of Institutional Ethnography
219
Glossary
223
Reference List
231
Index
245
About the Author
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Dorothy E. Smith is professor emerita in the Department of Sociology & Equity Studies in Education at the University of Toronto and adjunct professor, Department of Sociology, University of Victoria, BC.

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