An Appeal to the Public, on the Subject of the Riots in Birmingham: To which are Added, Strictures on a Pamphlet, Intitled [sic] 'Thoughts on the Late Riot at Birmingham'

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J. Thompson, 1791 - Birmingham (England) - 181 pages
 

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Page 130 - ... any injury done to us as a meritorious thing; and not having been better informed, the means were not attended to. When the object was right, you thought the means could not be wrong. By the...
Page 137 - Revolution in Poland prove the harbinger of a more perfect system of liberty extending to that great kingdom. 12. May the Nations of Europe become so enlightened as never more to be deluded into savage wars, by the mad ambition of their rulers. 13. May the sword...
Page 131 - ... but every thing to inflame them; hence, without any consideration on your part, or on theirs, who ought to have known, and taught you better, you were prepared for every species of outrage; thinking that whatever you could do to spite and injure us, was for the support of government, and especially the church. In destroying us, you have been led to think, you did God and your country the most substantial service.
Page 135 - ... of King, Lords, and Commons: surely no freeborn Englishman can refrain from exulting in this addition to the general mass of human happiness. It is the cause of humanity, it is the cause of the people.
Page 144 - ... computation that can be made, will amount to upwards of One Hundred Thousand Pounds ; the whole of which enormous sum will be charged upon the respective parishes, and paid out of the rates. We, therefore, as your friends, conjure you immediately to desist from the destruction of any more houses...
Page 129 - Despotism,' fell ! Remember the enthusiasm peculiar to the cause of liberty with which it was attacked ! Remember that generous humanity that taught the oppressed, groaning under the weight of...
Page 144 - FRIENDS AND FELLOW COUNTRYMEN, — It is earnestly requested that every true friend to the Church of England, and to the laws of his country, will reflect how much a continuance of the present proceedings must injure that Church and that King they are intended to support, and how highly unlawful it is to destroy the rights and property of any of our neighbours. And all true friends to the town and trade of Birmingham, in particular, are intreated to forbear immediately from all riotous...
Page 129 - My countrymen, the second year of Gallic liberty is nearly expired. At the commencement of the third, on the 14th of this month, it is devoutly to be wished that every enemy to civil and religious despotism would give his sanction to the majestic common cause by a public celebration of the anniversary. Remember that on the 14th of July, the Bastille, that ' High Altar and Castle of Despotism...
Page 130 - But is it possible to forget that your own parliament is venal? Your minister hypocritical? Your clergy legal oppressors? The reigning family extravagant? The crown of a certain great personage becoming every day too weighty for the head that wears it? Too weighty for the people who gave it? Your taxes partial and excessive? Your representation a cruel insult upon the sacred rights of property, religion and freedom...
Page 135 - Birmingham Commemoration of the French Revolution Several hand-bills having been circulated in the town, which can only be intended to create distrust concerning the intention of the meeting, to disturb its harmony and inflame the minds of the people; the gentlemen who proposed it, think it necessary to declare their entire disapprobation of all such hand-bills, and their ignorance of the authors. Sensible themselves of the advantages of...

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