The Philosophy of Necessity: Or, the Law of Consequences; as Applicable to Mental, Moral, and Social Science

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Longman, Orme, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1841 - Free will and determinism
 

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Page 246 - It is a modest creed, and yet Pleasant if one considers it, To own that death itself must be. Like all the rest, a mockery. That garden sweet, that lady fair, And all sweet shapes and odours there. In truth have never passed away: Tis we, 'tis ours, are changed; not they. For love, and beauty, and delight, There is no death nor change; their might Exceeds our organs, which endure No light, being themselves obscure.
Page 45 - Three quintals are a crushing load for ' him ; the steer of the meadow tosses him aloft, like a waste ' rag. Nevertheless he can use Tools, can devise Tools : with ' these the granite mountain melts into light dust before him ; • he kneads glowing iron, as if it were soft paste ; seas are his ' smooth highway, winds and fire his unwearying steeds. No' where do you find him without Tools ; without Tools he is ' nothing, with Tools he is all.
Page 96 - Whereas, were the capacities of our understandings well considered, the extent of our knowledge once discovered, and the horizon found which sets the bounds between the enlightened and dark parts of things; between what is and what is not comprehensible by us, men would perhaps with less scruple acquiesce in the avowed ignorance of the one, and employ their thoughts and discourse with more advantage and satisfaction in the other.
Page 114 - Then sawest thou that this fair Universe, were it in the meanest province thereof, is in very deed the star-domed City of God; that through every star, through every grass-blade, and most through every Living Soul, the glory of a present God still beams. But Nature, which is the Time-vesture of God, and reveals Him to the wise, hides Him from the foolish.
Page 87 - Know of a truth that only the Time-shadows have perished, or are perishable; that the real Being of whatever was, and whatever is, and whatever will be, is even now and forever.
Page 518 - And the multitude of them that believed were of one heart and of one soul, neither said any of them, that aught of the things which he possessed was his own, but they had all things common.
Page 96 - For I thought that the first step towards satisfying several inquiries the mind of man was very apt to run into, was, to take a survey of our own understandings, examine our own powers, and see to what things they were adapted.
Page 171 - To prevent this, we have a power to suspend the prosecution of this or that desire, as every one daily may experiment in himself. This seems to me the source of all liberty; in this seems to consist that which is (as I think improperly) called freewill.
Page 243 - When Death strikes down the innocent and young, for every fragile form from which he lets the panting spirit free, a hundred virtues rise, in shapes of mercy, charity, and love, to walk the world, and bless it with their light. Of every tear that sorrowing mortals shed on such green graves, some good is born, some gentler nature comes.
Page 589 - That any character — from the best to the worst, from the most ignorant to the most enlightened — may be given to any community, even to the world at large, by applying certain means, which are to a great extent at the command and under the control, or easily made so, of those who possess the government of nations.

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