Longer exercises in Latin prose composition, chiefly tr. from the writings of modern Latinists: with an intr. and notes by J.W. Donaldson

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John William Donaldson
1853
 

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Page 99 - and tell you a truth, which perchance ye will marvel at. One of the greatest benefits that ever God gave me, is, that he sent me so sharp and severe parents, and so gentle a schoolmaster. For when I am in presence either of father or mother ; whether I speak, keep silence, sit, stand, or go, eat, drink, be merry, or sad, be sewing, playing, dancing, or doing...
Page 98 - I wist, all their sport in the park is but a shadow to that pleasure that I find in Plato. Alas! good folk, they never felt what true pleasure meant.
Page 98 - Her parents, the Duke and Duchess, with all the household, gentlemen and gentlewomen, were hunting in the park : I found her...
Page 101 - Who art thou that judgest another man's servant? to his own master he standeth or falleth ; yea, he shall be holden up: for God is able to make him stand.
Page 81 - If he had not so great a stock as some have had who flourished formerly, of knowledge long treasured up, he knew better by far than any man I ever was acquainted with, how to bring together within a short time, all that was necessary to establish, to illustrate, and to decorate that side of the question he supported.
Page 99 - God made the world, or else I am so sharply taunted, so cruelly threatened — yea, presently, sometimes with pinches, nips, and bobs, and other ways, which I will not name for the honour I bear them, so without measure misordered, that I think myself in hell, till time come that I must go to Mr.
Page 99 - I bear them) so without measure misordered, that I think myself in hell, till time come that I must go to Mr. Elmer ; who teacheth me so gently, so pleasantly, with such fair allurements to learning, that I think all the time nothing while I am with him. And when I am called from him, I fall on weeping, because whatsoever I do else but learning, is full of grief, trouble, fear, and whole misliking unto me.
Page 81 - He stated his matter skilfully and powerfully. He particularly excelled in a most luminous explanation, and display of his subject. His style of argument was neither trite and vulgar nor subtle and abstruse. He hit the house just between wind and water.— And not being troubled with too anxious a zeal for any matter in question, he was never more tedious, or more earnest, than the pre-conceived opinions, and present temper of his hearers required ; to whom he was always in perfect unison. He conformed...

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