Culture by Self-help in a Literary, an Academic Or an Oratorical Career

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Dodd, Mead, 1909 - Self-culture - 369 pages

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Page 275 - O gentle sleep, Nature's soft nurse, how have I frighted thee, That thou no more wilt weigh my eyelids down...
Page 87 - And some said, Let them live ; some, Let them die, Some said, John print it ; others said, Not so : Some said, It might do good ; others said, No.
Page 253 - And the round ocean, and the living air, And the blue sky, and in the mind of man; A motion and a spirit that impels All thinking things, all objects of all thought, And rolls through all things. Therefore am I still A lover of the meadows and the woods And mountains...
Page 252 - What then I was. The sounding cataract Haunted me like a Passion! the tall rock, The mountain, and the deep and gloomy wood, Their colours and their forms, were then to me An appetite! a feeling and a love That had no need of a remoter charm, By thought supplied; or any interest Unborrowed from the eye!
Page 120 - Till the Ledaean stars, so famed for love, Wonder'd at us from above! We spent them not in toys, in lusts, or wine; But search of deep philosophy, Wit, eloquence, and poetry — Arts which I loved, for they, my friend, were thine.
Page 251 - And from the gray old trunks that high in heaven Mingled their mossy boughs, and from the sound Of the invisible breath that swayed at once All their green tops, stole over him, and bowed His spirit with the thought of boundless power And inaccessible majesty.
Page 178 - Heaven is not reached at a single bound ; But we build the ladder by which we rise From the lowly earth to the vaulted skies, And we mount to its summit round by round.
Page 101 - Pitt through all her classes of venality. Corruption imagined, indeed, that she had found defects in this statesman, and talked much of the inconsistency of his glory, and much of the ruin of his victories; but the history of his country, and the calamities of the enemy, answered and refuted her. Nor were his political abilities his only talents.
Page 101 - Upon the whole, there was in this man something that could create, subvert, or reform ; an understanding, a spirit, and an eloquence, to summon mankind to society, or to break the bonds of slavery asunder, and to rule the wilderness of free minds with unbounded authority ; something that could establish or overwhelm empire, and strike a blow in the world that should resound through the universe.
Page 332 - I speak in the spirit of the British law, which makes liberty commensurate with and inseparable from British soil ; which proclaims even to the stranger and the sojourner, the moment he sets his foot upon British earth, that the ground on which he treads is holy, and consecrated by the genius of Universal Emancipation.

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