Newton's London Journal of Arts and Sciences: Being Record of the Progress of Invention as Applied to the Arts..., Volume 18

Front Cover
William Newton, Charles Frederick Partington
W. Newton, 1841 - Industrial arts
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 426 - That any person or persons having discovered or invented any new and useful art, machine, manufacture, or composition of matter, or any new and useful improvement on any art, machine, manufacture, or composition of matter...
Page 347 - Arabia. Contiguous to it is a mountain which stretches towards Memphis, and contains quarries of stone. Commencing at the foot of this, it extends from west to east, through a considerable tract of country, and where a mountain opens to the south, is discharged into the Ara.
Page 45 - The plaintiff had obtained a patent for " an invention of improvements in cards, for carding wool, cotton, silk, and other fibrous substances, and for raising the pile of woollen cloths.
Page 20 - I consider to be new in the processes above described, and therefore claim as the invention secured to me by the hereinbefore in part recited Letters Patent is, 1.
Page 387 - To John Gordon Campbell, of the city of Glasgow, in the county of Lanark, merchant, and John Gibson, of the same city and county, throwster, for their invention of a new or improved process or manufacture of silk, and silk in combination with certain other fibrous substances.
Page 414 - Mills, from his experience as a ship-builder, at Glasgow, was enabled to confirm all that Mr. Seaward had advanced. On the Clyde, the employment of an excess of power in steam vessels had been carried to the greatest extent, without producing corresponding advantages, either for speed, or in a commercial point of view. It would appear that the same error had, to a certain degree, been committed on the Thames, but less than on the Clyde; for on the latter river there were vessels with nearly double...
Page 22 - Having thus described the nature of my invention, and the manner of performing the same, I would have it understood that I do not confine myself to the...
Page 410 - ... Pacific, Mexico, Brazil, Australia, and all the distant colonies, which now demand rapid communication with England. The author refers to a pamphlet, published by him in 1827, entitled, " Observations on the possibility of successfully employing Steam Power in navigating Ships between this country and the East Indies by the Cape of Good Hope.
Page 54 - The black oxide of manganese has no advantages but that of being a powerful drier. The defects of all oil paints arise from the instability of their bases ; the acids which enter into the constitution of all fixed oils readily quit their weakly positive organic bases to form salts with the oxides of the metal on which they may be laid. Hence we must look for improvements in our paints to those substances among the organic groups which have greater stability than the fat or fixed oils, and which,...
Page 204 - By Charles Hood, FRAS, &c. The theoretical determination of the velocity with which gaseous fluids are discharged through tubes and apertures, has frequently been investigated by mathematicians ; and as the question is one of importance in various branches of practical science, the author examines the several theorems which have been proposed for its elucidation, and compares them with the results obtained by experimental researches. Dr. Papin, in 1686, appears to have first ascertained the law of...

Bibliographic information