Looking Queer: Body Image and Identity in Lesbian, Bisexual, Gay, and Transgender Communities

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Psychology Press, 1998 - Social Science - 467 pages
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Looking Queer: Body Image in Lesbian, Bisexual, Gay, and Transgender Communities contains research, firsthand accounts, poetry, theory, and journalistic essays that address and outline the special needs of sexual minorities when dealing with eating disorders and appearance obsession. Looking Queer will give members of these communities hope, insight, and information into body image issues, helping you to accept and to love your body. In addition, scholars, health care professionals, and body image activists will not only learn about queer experiences and identity and how they affect individuals, but will also understand how some of the issues involved affect society as a whole.

Dismantling the myth that body image issues affect only heterosexual women, Looking Queer explores body issues based on gender, race, class, age, and disability. Furthermore, this groundbreaking book attests to the struggles, pain, and triumph of queer people in an open and comprehensive manner. More than 60 contributors provide their knowledge and personal experiences in dealing with body image issues exclusive to the gay and transgender communities, including:
  • exploring and breaking down the categories of gender and sexuality that are found in many body image issues
  • finding ways to heal yourself and your community
  • discovering what it means to “look like a dyke” or to “look gay”
  • fearing fat as a sign of femininity
  • determining what race has to do with the gay ideal
  • discussing the stereotyped ”double negative”--being a fat lesbian
  • learning strategies of resistance to societal ideals
  • critiquing ”the culture of desire” within gay men's communities that emphasizes looks above everything else

    Revealing new and complex dimensions to body image issues, Looking Queer not only discusses the struggles and hardships of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered persons, but looks at the processes that can lead to acceptance of oneself. Written by both men and women, the topics and research in Looking Queer offer insight into the lives of people you can relate to, enabling you to learn from their experiences so you, too, can find joy and happiness in accepting your body.

    Visit Dawn Atkin's website at: http://home.earthlink.net/~dawn_atkins/
 

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Contents

About the Editor
xiii
Acknowledgments
xxvii
CONSTRUCTING OURSELVES
3
Sexual Identity and Body
27
Theories and Realities of Lesbian
37
Lesbians and the ReDeConstruction of the Female Body
47
LOOKING DYKE
69
A Femme Strikes Back
83
BOYZ GRRLS QUEERS
233
Rejecting and Embracing Standards
239
A Girls Own Story
245
COLOR VISION
251
Redefining the Myths Around the Black
259
Hunting Down the Male Erotic in India
271
The Gay Asian
277
Like My Chiisai Body Now
295

OutofBody Experiences
99
That Other Girl Who Is Not Me
115
A WOMANS LOVE HEALS
129
Ode to My Vibrator
137
My Ideal Becoming Real
145
COMING OUT LEAVING BEHIND
153
My Big Fat Body
161
Boogey woman
177
My Life As an Erroneous Sonogram
189
Holding My Breath Underwater
199
SQUARE PEGS
205
Intersexuality in the Field of Queer
221
Living BiGendered in a SingleGendered
227
InsideOutside
307
Body Language
313
Love Poem
323
Has Our Imagery Become Overidealizcd?
345
A Matter of Size
355
Fatness and the Feminized Man
367
FEELING THE BURN
373
Reps
383
Your Dreamworld Is Just About to End
389
REENVISIONING MEN
413
Rescuing the Male Body
431
Index
455
Copyright

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