Page images
PDF
EPUB
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

820)
J73

V.2.

EDINBURGII:

Printed by WILLIAM TAIT, 107, Prince's Street.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

THE

EDINBURGH TALES.

THE AUTHOR'S DAUGHTER.

BY MARY HOWITT.

CHAPTER I.

providing out of their own family a Lawford

to occupy the living of Lawford, which, of Mr. FRANK Lawford offended his family course, was in their gift—a comfortable way by three things. He turned author ; he it was of serving God, for the living had adopted liberal opinions in politics; and he always been a good one, and, at the time of married a poor and nameless wife. Any our story, amounted to £800 a-year. one of these would have been bad enough, But whatever the Lawfords of former according to the hereditary notions of the times had been as to wealth, Peter Lawford, Lawford family ; but all these combined in when he came into possession of the estate, one person, was an unimaginable delinquency found that its revenues were somewhat enwhich the Lawfords could not forgive. But cumbered. Peter was the second son, and in order that our readers may have a more had been brought up to the law, for which definite idea of this family, which had con he always entertained the highest regard ; sidered itself par excellence sans reproche, we holding it as his firm opinion, that, had fate must go back to the time of Peter Lawford, left him to pursue his own course, he should the old squire.

have risen to the highest eminence. But Peter Lawford, and his ancestors before fate made a country gentleman of him ; and him, had been members of the squirearchy of as it is a much easier and safer thing to Leicestershire for some hundreds of years. regret the loss of greatness than to try to The chancel vault was full of the bones of achieve it, Peter sate down contentedly on the Lawfords, male and female ; and the the broad lands of Lawford, to try to rid himchurch walls were covered with monumental self of the encumbrances which he had never tablets, in marble and brass, commemorating expected to find there. The older Lawford their virtues and their greatness. The Law had been a speculator before the true time for fords of the fifteenth century endowed the profitable speculation began, and therefore grammar school; the Lawfords built the won for himself the character of insanity, alms-houses; the Lawfords had given, and because he laid down in his park an infant still gave, doles of beef and fuel to the poor rail-road, on which he laboured hard to perat Christmas ; they had always sate on the fect self-propelling carriages. He built velomagisterial bench; they were in all trusts of cipedes and constructed balloons, but, poor bridges and turnpike roads for their part of man, succeeded in nothing. He was one of the county.

Lawfords also had sate in those men with glimmerings of truth before Parliament; they had served their king and the age is prepared to receive it; precursors country in the army and on sea; and accord of discoveries on the very verge of their birth. ing to their belief they served God also, by | Had Mr. Lawford lived fifty years later he Vol. II.

No. 27.

« PreviousContinue »