Some Account of Circumstances in the Life of Mary Pennington [sic.]from Her Manuscript, Left for Her Family

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Harvey and Darton, 1821 - Quakers - 103 pages
 

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Page 6 - I found he saw the deceit of all mere notions about religion ; he lay as one that refused to be comforted until He came to His temple
Page 66 - Die, die, must he die! I cannot go from him!' At which two of them gently lifted me in their arms, and carried me to the fire, which was at a...
Page 8 - He turned back again, saying he had a love for my husband, seeing grace in his looks. He drew nigh to the pales, and spoke of the light and grace of God that had appeared to all men. My husband and he having engaged in discourse, the man of the house coming up invited the stranger in. He was but young, and perceiving my husband was too able for him in the fleshly wisdom, said he would bring...
Page 33 - ... settled. I feel that death is a king of terrors, and know that my strength to triumph over him, must be given me by the Lord, at the very season when the trying time cometh. My sight to-day of things beyond the grave, will be insufficient in that hour, to keep me from the sting of death when he comes. It is the Lord alone will then be able to stand by me, and help me to resist the evil one, who is very busy when the tabernacle is dissolving: his work being at an end "when the earthen vessel is...
Page 11 - Ye will not come to me, that ye may have life.' It is true I am undone if I come not to thee, but I cannot come unless I leave that which cleaveth close unto me, and how can I part with it? I...
Page 4 - I stood at a great distance at the lower end of the great hall, and Christ at the upper end, whom I saw in the appearance of a fresh lovely youth, clad in grey cloth (at which time I had not heard of a Quaker or their habit) very plain and neat, of a most sweet, affable, courteous carriage and he embraced...

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