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" The fruit or venison which nourishes the wild Indian, who knows no enclosure, and is still a tenant in common, must be his, and so his (ie a part of him) that another can no longer have any right to it, before it can do him any good for the support of... "
Two Treatises of Government: By Iohn Locke - Page 212
by John Locke - 1764 - 416 pages
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The Works of John Locke, Volume 5

John Locke - 1823
...the wild Indian, who knows no enclosure, and is still a tenant in common, must be his, and so his, ie a part of him, that another can no longer have any...right to it, before it can do him any good for the support of his life. 27. Though the earth, and all inferior creatures, be common to all men, yet...
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The Univercœlum and Spiritual Philosopher, Volume 3, Issues 1-26

Parapsychology - 1848
...Indian, who knows no enclosure, and is still a tenant in common, must be his, and so his, ie a port of him, that another can no longer have any right to it, before it con do him any good for the support of his life. " Though the earth and all the inferior creatures...
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The Moderate Monarchy Or Principles of the British Constitution, Described ...

Albrecht von Baron HALLER - Constitutional history - 1849 - 344 pages
...nourishes the wild Indian, who knows no inclosure, and is still a tenant in common, must be his, and so his, /. e. a part of him, that another can no longer have any right to it, before it can d him any good for the support of his life. " Though the earth, and all inferior creatures be common...
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Principles of Social and Political Economy, Or, The Laws of the ..., Volume 1

William Atkinson - Economics - 1858 - 645 pages
...wild Indian, who knows no inclosure, and is still a tenant in common, must be his, and so his, ie, a part of him, that another can no longer have any right to it, before it can do any good for the support of his life." "Though the earth and all inferior creatures be common to all...
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Systems of Land Tenure in Various Countries: A Series of Essays Published ...

Cobden Club (London, England) - Agricultural laws and legislation - 1870 - 420 pages
...the more complicated question lies waiting for us yet one stage * The words of Locke are as follows : "Though the earth, and all inferior creatures, be common to all men, yet every man hath a property in his own person : this nobody has a right to but himself. The labour of his body...
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Is Copyright Perpetual?: An Examination of the Origin and Nature of Literary ...

Eaton Sylvester Drone - 1875 - 23 pages
...theory that labor is the origin of the right of property is thus explained in his own language : — " Though the earth and all inferior creatures be common to all men, every man has a property in his own person ; this nobody has any right to but himself. The labor of...
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The Life of John Locke, Volume 2

Henry Richard Fox Bourne - 1876
...them some way or other before they can be of any use or at all beneficial to any particular man.'2___" Though the earth and all inferior creatures be common to all men, yet every man has a 1 ' Two Treatises of Government ' (1690), b. ii., 4, 6. 3 Ibid., b. ii., 8, 16. 3 Ibid.,...
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Two Treatises on Civil Government: Preceded by Sir Robert Filmer

John Locke, Robert Filmer - Liberty - 1884 - 318 pages
...wild Indian, who knows no enclosure, and is still a tenant in common, must be his, and so his — ie, a part of him, that another can no longer have any right to it before it can do him any good for the support of his life. 27. Though the earth and all inferior creatures be common to all men, yet every...
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Fur Seal Arbitration: Argument of the United States Before the Tribunal of ...

United States, Bering Sea Tribunal of Arbitration - Bering Sea controversy - 1893 - 327 pages
...same idea: "The fruit or venison which nourishes the wild Indian * * * mnst be his, and so his, ie, a part of him, that another can no longer have any right to it," etc. (Civil Government, Ch. v, $ 25.) "In making the object my own I stamped it with the mark of my...
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Fur Seal Arbitration, Volume 9

Bering Sea Tribunal of Arbitration - Bering Sea controversy - 1893
...idea: "The fruit or venison which nourishes the wild Indian • mnst be his, and so his, ie, a part of him, that another can no longer have any right to it," etc. (Civil Government, Ch. v, } 25.) ous and indisputable basis of necessity. " Necessity begat property."1...
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