Feminist Security Studies: A Narrative Approach

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Routledge, Dec 16, 2010 - Political Science - 160 pages

This book rethinks security theory from a feminist perspective – uniquely, it engages feminism, security, and strategic studies to provide a distinct feminist approach to security studies.

The volume explicitly works toward an opening up of security studies that would allow for feminist (and other) narratives to be recognized and taken seriously as security narratives. To make this possible, it presents a feminist reading of security studies that aims to invigorate the debate and radicalize critical security studies. Since feminism is a political project, and security studies are, at their base, about particular visions of the political and their attendant institutions, this is of necessity a political intervention. The book works through and beyond security studies to explore possible spaces where an opening of security, necessary to make way for feminist insights, can take place. While it develops and illustrates a feminist narrative approach to security, it is also intended as an intervention that challenges the politics of security and the meanings for security legitimized in existing practices.

This book provides develops a comprehensive framework for the emerging field of feminist security studies and will be of great interest to students and scholars of feminist IR, critical security studies, gender studies and IR and security studies in general.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
The politics of identity
10
2 Challenging meanings
27
3 Toward a narrative approach
43
4 Security as narrative
65
5 Feminist security narratives
86
6 The future of feminist security studies
107
Appendix
115
Notes
117
Bibliography
131
Index
150
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Annick T.R. Wibben is Assistant Professor of Politics and International Studies as well as Chair of the interdisciplinary Bachelor Program in International Studies at the University of San Francisco (USF), USA. From 2001- 2005 she was the Co-Investigator of the Information Technology, War and Peace Project at the Watson Institute for International Studies at Brown University, USA.

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