Nelsons' hand-book to Scotland: for tourists

Front Cover
T. Nelson and Sons, 1860 - Scotland - 536 pages
 

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Contents

From Dumfries to Moffat
39
THIRD DIVISION THE MIDDLE BORDER OR LAND OF SCOTT X From Edinburgh to Peebles
42
From Peebles to Moffat
48
From Peebles to Selkirk
50
From Edinburgh to Selkirk
52
From Selkirk to St Marys Loch
56
From Edinburgh to Hawick
60
From Hawick to Carlisle
69
From Hawick to New Castleton
72
From Hawick to Kelso
73
From Edinburgh to Kelso
80
From Kelso to Tweedmouth
81
FOURTH DIVISION EDINBURGH AND ITS EXVIRONS
86
Calton Hill Holyrood and Arthurs Seat
95
CONTENTS
99
The Castle and the Ancient City
104
The Modern Parts of the Old Town
117
The New Town and the Western Environs
122
The Eastern New Town Leith and Granton
127
FIFTH DIVISION THE CENTRAL LOWLANDS Page XXVI From Edinburgh to Queensferry
131
From Edinburgh to Stirling
132
From Edinburgh to Bathgate
141
From Edinburgh to Glasgow
142
From Stirling to Clydesdale
145
From Glasgow to Loch Lomond
149
From Glasgow to Helensburgh
152
SIXTH DIVISION CLYDESDALE XXXIV From Carstairs by Coatbridge to Glasgow
154
From Carstairs by Uddingstone to Glasgow
161
The Falls of Clyde and Cartland Crags
164
From Lanark to Douglas
168
From Lanark to Glasgow
169
From Douglas to Glasgow
175
SEVENTH DIVISION GLASGOW AND ITS ENVIRONS
177
The NorthEastern Districts with the Cathedral
181
The Central Districts with the University
185
The Western Districts with the Kelvin
190
The Southern Districts with the Harbour
193
EIGHTH DIVISION THE WESTERN LOWLANDS XLIV From Glasgow by Water to Greenock
198
From Glasgow by Railway to Greenock
204
From Greenock to Ardrossan
208
From Glasgow to Ardrossan
213
From Glasgow to Ayr
217
From Glasgow to Sanquhar
220
From Glasgow to Neilston
226
From Glasgow to Mearns and Eaglesham
228
NINTH DIVISION GALLOWAY AND CARRICK LII From Dumfries to Kirkbean
230
From Dumfries to PortPatrick
231
From Castle Douglas to Kirkcudbright
239
From NewtonStewart to Whithorn
240
From Stranraer to Ayr
242
From Ayr to Loch Doon
246
TENTH DIVISION
247
THE CLYDE HIGHLANDS AND ISLANDS Page LVIII From Greenock to Gairlochhead
247
From Greenock to Arrochar 218
247
From Greenock by Loch Goil to Iuverary
250
From Campbelton to Oban
281
From Oban to Staffa and Iona
284
From Oban to FortWilliam
296
From Loch Lomond to FortWilliam
300
TWELFTH DIVISION LOCH LOMOND AND THE GREATER PART OF PERTHSHIRE LXXIII Loch Lomond
303
From Loch Lomond Head to Aberfeldy
307
From Inversnaid by Callander to Stirling
311
From Inversnaid by Aberfoyle to Stirling
319
From Callander to Crieff
321
LXXVIIL From Stirling to Crieff
325
From Stirling to Perth
327
From Crieff to Perth
331
From Perth to Aberfeldy
333
From Dunkeld to Dalnacardoch
338
From Pitlochrie to Loch Rannoch
342
THIRTEENTH DIVISION THE LOWLANDS BETWEEN THE FORTH AND THE TAY LXXXIV From Stirling to Dunfermline
342
Froin Stirling to Kinross
349
From Kinross to Perth
352
From Dunfermline to Kilconquhar
355
From Edinburgh to Perth
359
From St Andrews to Crail and Pittenweem
369
FOURTEENTH DIVISION STRATHMORE ANGUS AND MEARNS XCI From Perth to Dundee
371
From Perth to Aberdeen
376
From Dundee to Aberdeen
388
FIFTEENTH DIVISION DEESIDE AND THENCE TO INVERNESS
391
From Aberdeen to Strathdon
400
From Aberdeen to Banff
404
From Aberdeen to Peterhead
407
From Aberdeen to Fraserburgh
409
From Aberdeen to Inverness Pago 391 400 404 407 409
410
SIXTEENTH DIVISION STRATHSPEY AND THE GREAT GLEN C From Inverness to Dalnacardoch
422
From Aviemore to Elgin
425
From Inverness to FortWilliam
427
From FortWilliam to Loch Laggan CIV The Coast between Ardnamurchan and Lochalsh 422 425 427
432
SKYE AND THE OUTER HEBRIDES
436
From Broadford to Dunvegan
439
From Portree round Trotternish
442
The Outer Hebrides 436 439 442
444
EIGHTEENTH DIVISION ROSS AND CROMARTY
448
CX From Inverness to Bonar Bridge
450
From Beauly to Shielhouse
456
From Dingwall to Poolewe
459
From KyleAkin to Lochinver 448 450 456 459
461
NINETEENTH DIVISION SUTHERLAND AND CAITHNESS CXIV From Bonar Bridge to Wick
464
From Wick to Tongue
468
From Bonar Bridge to Tongue
472
From Bonar Bridge to Lochinver
474
From Lochinver to Tongue 464 468 472 474
476
TWENTIETH DIVISION ORKNEY
481
Southern Orkney
481
Central Orkney
483
Northern Orkney
486
CXXII Shetland
488
486
514
INDEX
518

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 435 - But here, — above, around, below, On mountain or in glen, Nor tree, nor shrub, nor plant, nor flower, Nor aught of vegetative power, The weary eye may ken. For all is rocks at random thrown, Black waves, bare crags, and banks of stone, As if were here denied The summer sun, the spring's sweet dew, That clothe with many a varied hue The bleakest mountain-side.
Page 312 - The western waves of ebbing day Rolled o'er the glen their level way; Each purple peak, each flinty spire, Was bathed in floods of living fire. But not a setting beam could glow Within the dark ravines below, Where twined the path in shadow hid, Round many a rocky pyramid, Shooting abruptly from the dell Its thunder-splintered pinnacle...
Page 312 - Boon nature scattered, free and wild. Each plant or flower, the mountain's child. Here eglantine embalmed the air, Hawthorn and hazel mingled there ; The primrose pale and violet flower Found in each clift a narrow bower; Foxglove and nightshade, side by side, Emblems of punishment and pride, Grouped their dark hues with every stain The weather-beaten crags retain.
Page 312 - Grey birch and aspen wept beneath ; Aloft, the ash and warrior oak Cast anchor in the rifted rock ; And, higher yet, the pine-tree hung His shattered trunk, and frequent flung, Where seemed the cliffs to meet on high, His boughs athwart the narrowed sky.
Page 94 - VEN thus, methinks, a city reared should be, Yea, an imperial city, that might hold Five times a hundred noble towns in fee, And either with their might of Babel old, Or the rich Roman pomp of empery Might stand compare, highest in arts enrolled, Highest in arms ; brave tenement for the free, Who never crouch to thrones, or sin for gold. Thus should her towers be raised — with vicinage Of clear bold hills, that curve her very streets, As if to vindicate 'mid choicest seats Of art, abiding Nature's...
Page 435 - Hath rent a strange and shattered way Through the rude bosom of the hill, And that each naked precipice, Sable ravine, and dark abyss, Tells of the outrage still. The wildest glen but this can show Some touch of Nature's genial glow ; On high Benmore green mosses grow, And heath-bells bud in deep...
Page 425 - Fyers pours his mossy floods ; Till full he dashes on the rocky mounds, Where, through a shapeless breach, his stream resounds. As high in air the bursting torrents flow, As deep recoiling surges foam below, Prone down the rock the whitening sheet descends, And viewless echo's ear, astonish'd, rends.
Page 470 - Round about, there are four mountains, which seem as if they had tumbled down from the clouds ; having nothing to do with the country or each other, either in shape, materials, position or character, and which look very much as if they were wondering how they got there.
Page 292 - We were now treading that illustrious island, which was once the luminary of the Caledonian regions, whence savage clans and roving barbarians derived the benefits of knowledge, and the blessings of religion. To abstract the mind from all local emotion would be impossible, if it were endeavoured, and would be foolish, if it were possible. Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses ; whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future predominate over the present, advances...
Page 312 - Where glist'ning streamers waved and danced, The wanderer's eye could barely view The summer heaven's delicious blue ; So wondrous wild, the whole might seem ""^e scenery of a fairy dream.

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