A manual of naval tactics: with a brief analysis of the principal modern naval battles

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Page 68 - Something must be left to chance ; nothing is sure in a Sea Fight beyond all others. Shot will carry away the masts and yards of friends as well as foes ; but I look with confidence to a Victory before the Van of the Enemy could succour their Rear...
Page 67 - The Second in Command will, after my intentions are made known to him, have the entire direction of his Line to make the attack upon the Enemy, and to follow up the blow until they are captured or destroyed.
Page 69 - In case signals cannot be seen or clearly understood, no captain can do wrong if he places his ship alongside that of an enemy.
Page 67 - ... without such a loss of time that the opportunity would probably be lost of bringing the enemy to battle in such a manner as to make the business decisive. I have therefore made up my mind to keep the fleet in that" position of sailing (with the exception of the first and second in command) that the order of sailing is to be the order of battle...
Page 67 - I have, therefore, made up my mind to keep the fleet in that position of sailing (with the exception of the first and second in command) that the order of sailing is to be the order of battle, placing the fleet in two lines of...
Page 69 - Enemy, they will effectually complete the business of twelve Sail of the Enemy. Should the Enemy wear together, or bear up and sail large, still the...
Page 69 - Should the enemy wear together, or bear up and sail large, still the 12 ships composing, in the first position, the enemy's rear are to be the object of attack of the lee line, unless otherwise directed by the Commander-inChief, which is scarcely to be expected, as the entire management of the lee line, after the intentions of the Commander-inChief are signified, is intended to be left to the judgment of the admiral commanding that line.
Page 68 - Something must be left to chance. Nothing is sure in a sea-fight : beyond all others, shot •will carry away the masts and yards of friends as well as foes ; but I look with confidence to a victory before the van of the enemy could succour their rear; and then, that the British fleet would, most of them, be ready to receive their...
Page 67 - Thinking it almost impossible to bring a Fleet of forty Sail of the Line into a Line of Battle in variable winds, thick weather, and other circumstances which must occur, without such a loss of time that the opportunity would probably be lost of bringing the Enemy to Battle in such a manner as to make the business decisive, I have therefore made up my mind...
Page 69 - Sail, are to be left to the management of the Commander-in-Chief, who will endeavour to take care that the movements of the Second in Command are as little interrupted as is possible.

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