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Wallace's Tower.

Tha'ages and years unheeded have rün,

No pillar bears Wallace's name,
But who has not heard, what Bard has not sụng

His glory and worth in the song,
Till Scotia's bleak hills all joyfu: have rung,

While the strains were echoed along?
The Bards of thy land have tuned the bold lyre,

O Scotia, and sung of his might,
Thy warriors too, have glow'd with hisfire,

And rushed with his soul to the fight.

And carry

And often and gladly the old rev'rend sage

To the wond'ring striplings would tell, How valiant he fought, how deadly his rage,

When round him the base Southrons fell; And aye as they hear their young bosoms burn,

And their hearts exultingly bound,
As oft for the bold hero's pillar they turn,

Nor pillar, nor monument found.
But now the brave youth shall nat seek in vain

For a column majestic shall rise; Proudly pre-eminent look o'er the plain,

its head to the skies; While tow'zing aloft, its tall stately form

A place of distinction commands; Around it in vain may gather the storm

Like him to whose mem'ry it stands,
Then shall the noble and dignified pile

The youth's fond attention arrest,
While rising emotions of rapture the while

Shall swell uncontroul'd in his breast :
And how he shall burn when the story is told

Of Wallace and his warlike band,
Whose mighty atchievments, dauntless and bold,

Gave freedom and peace to our land.

Scotia, when despot insulted thy laws,

No power came thy freedom to save,
Then Wallace arose, stood forth in thy cause,

And led on thy handful of brave.
Bold was the spirit that proudly maintained

Thy glory, and stood as thy shield
In dark bloody day, and bravely sustained

The shock of thy foes in the field.
Then swept thro' thy land the wild storm of warg

And spread devastation and gloom

Wallace's Tower.

The Patriot appeared like a bright guiding star,

Thy desolate hills to illume;
The black threat’ning clouds indignant that lour,

Dread omens of tyranny's sway,
Are scatter'd before his unsubdued power,

And instantly vanish away.
For our independence he waded thro' blood,

And dared the invaders oppose,
The front of the battle he fearlessly stood,

He routedhe vanquish'd our foes;
To age after age his fame shall go down,

And the son shall learn from his sire
His noble resistance, his feats of renown,

That still the young bosom inspire,
The flame is not gone that urged on thy sons,

When bursting sad slavery's chains,
As pure and as warm the blood circling runs,

And angrily swells in our veins;
For just is the tribute, due to the brave,

As sons of those heroes we pay,
Who mąde Scotia's ensigns triumphantly wave,

When bloody and bleak was the day.
My country, O Scotia, let homage be done,

'And honour to his memory,
For great were the deeds of thy patriot son,

That make us so happy and free;
To countries around the tall stately tower

Shall tell of the deeds of his fame,
And nations admire thy glory and power,

And honour thy Wallace's name.
Glasgow, 15th March, 1819.

SCOTUS

Scrapiana Poetica.

SCRAPIANA POETICA.

no more.

A GAELIC PROPHECY.

Free to pass the harmless joke.

And the tube sedately smoke: * Seven years before that awful day,

Free to drink just what they please When time shall be no more,

As at home and at their ease; A watery deluge shall o'ersweep

Free to speak an free to think Hibernia's mossy shore.

No tale-bearer with me drink; The green-clad Isia too shall sink,

Free to stay a night or so ;
Whilst with the great and good,

When uneasy-free to go.
Columba's happy isle shall rear
Her towers above the flood.

LINES IN A WATCH CASE.
JEU D'ESPRIT ON LALLA ROQKH. Could but our tempers move like this Ma-
Sunshine

and moonshine, by hook or by Not urgʻa’by passions, nor delay'd by spleen;

crook, With bowers and flowers, and many a But true to nature's regulating pow's brook ;

By virtuous acts distinguish'd every hour. Fairy regions, which never were dreamt Then health and joy would follow as they of by Cook;

ought, Rosy lips, rosy curls too, and tresses which The laws of motion, and the laws of shook

thought By the amorous breezes, enchantingly look: Sweet health to pass the present moments With bright eyes which glance into every

o'er, nook,

And ever lasting joy, when time shall be Speaking language which might even puzzle Horn Tooke,

THE HAPPY MAN. If Purley his spirit from Plato could hook: In short, you can't guess what you'll find How blest the man (if such a man there in the book

be) Which Tom Moore has written, and call'd From malice, envy, and ill-nature free! Lalla Rookh!

Whose heart ne'er swells with passion,

nor with pride, A RHAPSODY.

Who feels his follies, and his friend's would

hide; As I walk'd by myself, I said to myself, And myself said again to me;

To heaven's high will in ev'ry state resign'd Look to thyself, take care of thyself,

The turns of fortune bears with equal

mind; For nobody cares for thee:

Who lives with death forever in his eye, Then I said to myself, and thus answer'd myself,

And learns in life that mighty task-to die. With the self same rapartee,

EPITAPH ON A MISER. Look to thyself, or look not to thyself, 'Tis the self same thing to me.

Reader! survey this monumental pile,

Nor drop a tear of pity all the while;
EPIGRAM.

It rose enjoin'd by will, at mighty cost; Dły heart still hovering round about you,

For dead by it the Miser nothing lost. I thought I could not live without you:

He died a victim at the shrine of pelf; Now we have liv'd three months asunder, He died because he never lov'd himself; How I liv'd with you is the wonder. He died a great revenge inspir'd the whira,

Mankind he hated, mankind hated him: INSCRIPTION FOR A LETTER CASE. He died; tate ne'er șike him could debt Swift messengers ! no farther move,

forgive; But with me be content to stay :

He died because he knew not how to live.
You tell me of the friends I love,
When those I love are far away.

EPIGRAM,
But yet should Fortune cause us part,
At Fortune think not I repine;

Giving the reason why Women are with,

out beards. For on the tablet of my heart I'll fondly trace each lasting line. How wisely Nature, ordering all below,

Forbade a beard on woman's chin to grow; INSCRIPTION FOR A GENTLEMAN'SFor how could she be shav'd, whate'er the CHIMNEY-PIECE.

skin, To my best, my friends are free;

Whose tongue would never let her chin

be still, Free with that and free with me;

TO THE

FIRST VOLUME,

Page:

Essays, Letters, Tales, &c.

Page.
Anger, on

57 Kenspeckle, Matthew, Letter II. on the
Age we live in, the

101 Street Music of Glasgow, &c. 1249
Allegory, an

230

Letter III. on the Ladies of
Anecdote, humorous

113
Glasgow,

292
of Alexander I.
154 Laughter, on

227
Blood Avenger, on the; and Arabian Story Levities,

260
of Kais
261, 262 Luxury, on

255
Cards Spiritualized, the
269 Medical Report,

71
Controversy, on
5 Miracle, a Popish

22
Conscience, on
6 Miscellaneous Information,

45
Cole, Dr. the persecutor

194 Newspapers, Strictures on the incorrectness
Dandy, the peculiarities of a
60 of,

24
Dandiana,

143

Origin of; in England and
Death, singular escapes from

190
Scotland,

194
Death Watch,

259
The Readers of

195
Dog, sagacity of a

231 Periodical Publications, on the advantages
Dress, on
62 of Reading,

2
Dream, Mr. Smart's

309 Portfolio, 29, 72, 116, 156, 196, 136, 280, 321
Edward and Egwina, a Tale,
19 Prudence, on

58
Ettleweel, Andrew, Scotch Letter on Sab- Proverbs, a Round of 48, 88, 128, 168
bath Abuses,
68 Reflections in a Boats

129
Indecent practices between ser.

on a Melancholy Event, 229
mons on Sunday,

110 Remarks on the subjects of A. Ettleweel's
Remarks on the subjects of these Letters, by Forceps,

147
letters, by Forceps and S. Simple, 147, 173

By Saunders Simple, ,

173
Improprieties at Christenings, 231 Rectitude, Perseverance in

188
Fortune Telling;
180 | Rights of Man, the True

271
Fragment, a

298 Standard of Rights, against

lowering the 300
Genius, the Fate of

139 Scrapiana Poetica, 208, 248, 288 330
Harp, Æolian, on the

289 Scots, Remarks on the Nationality of
Happiness, Allegorical Essay on

8 the

273, 301
Hospitality Rewarded,
63 Secresy, on

141
Ibrahim; a Persian Tale,
108 Sublimity of Shopkeepers,

23
Imaginary Beings, on
132 Supernatural Powers,

89, 264
Imprisonment of the Learned, 158

Answer to Vetus by Forceps, 183
Introduction,

1

Observations on the Letters of
Indian Dialogue,

115 Mungo Morris and Forceps, by Vetus, 215
Indian Horse-stealer, dexterity of an 235 System-mania,

209
Irish Cabin,

67 Talents,

160, 140
Jeu D'Esprit,

155 University of Glasgow, on the; Humanity
Kinloch, Gavin, mourning the loss f his Class,

13
33, 151
Greek Classs

49
Kenspeckle, Matthew, Letter I. on the

Logic Class

109
Buildings of Glasgow; Remarks on the

Moral Philosophy Class, 176
Students, &c.

169

Natural Philosophy Class, 320
Virtue, on the General Improvement in 97

Port-Folio.
Ass, the wandered 325

on Mots, 73, 199 Cromwell, Bon Mot of 325
Advice, a good
29 Boxers,
206 Church Discipline,

116
Alliteration,

236 Brave Irish soldier, a 117 Character, a singular 19/
Answer, an unexpected 237 Burke's Irritability, 118 Clerical Avarice,
Apothecary's Sign, an

73
158 Bull, a
Bagpiper, the Scotch,

156 Clergyman's three wives, 73
Eekker, portrait of,

son, &c.

1

Conscience,
196 |Chcapening,

159
73' Concert,

282 Caution, a

Page

238

Page

Pagë

SO
Debt, a new way of pay- / Mortifying explanation, 157 Salt
ing a
281 Names,

72

158 Scandal,
Diamonds, the nine of 237 Negro refusing to be hon- Senses, effect of music on
Distinction without a differ- oured,

117

238
ence, a

280 Newspapers, cross readings Shebbeare, Dr. and Pad.
Distinction,

from the
199 dy,

157
Dumbness, & cure for 282 Ostler,

29

288 Simplicity,
Eruption,
32 Pedant and illiterate Mag- Singular Bill.

131
Extravagant Charges, re- istrate, the

198 Sign-boards; singular 237
ceipt for
156 Pious Zeal,
32 Slander,

73
Fellow, Obstinate 325 Pies; choice of 237 Sleeping Court,

75
Fish-rod, meaning of a 281 Pope, an attempt to con- Soda Wate

199
Friendship in trade, no 298 vert the

31 Spanish Poet, a

118
Francis 1. and his fool, 281 Porteous, Capt.

72 Terror, mutual

236
Greatness, true
72 Politician, Female

198

76 Time, on
Hiberianism,

236 Poet and Pope Clement; 196 Title Page, Moderh 324
Hearts, the ten of 238 Policy, singular 236 Toasts,

157
Infallibility,
74 Preacher, a

981

158 Trade; how to get
Inscription, curious 198 Proposal, a strange

29

281 Vice,
Irish Reasoning,

72 | Puns,
158, 197, 237 Virtue,

30
Logic,

117 Quaker's Letter, a 117 Watchman, the accomodato
Roads,
198 Queen Elizabeth; 198 ing

116
Irishman and Driver, 156. Quandary, a

199 Weeping Image; 74
Luxuries in Shetland, 117 Rapartee

324 Wise man. &

29
Man, a Passionate 325 Rats, how to get quit of 32 Witch, a

30
Maxims, 32, 75, 118 Restriction;

72 Wit, Irish

158
Match, a
280 Reformation,

74 Moral,
Mirror of Flattery,
29 Reciprocation

118 Waterloo Medal, value of 324
Medical Jurisprudence, 32 Rebuke, a

281 Women

73
Mistakes,

1963 280

Poetry:
American Poetry,
81 Miss to

S28
Anacreon, the First Şang o',
34 Minstrel, the

160
Blind Irish Harper's Lament for Dog, 57 Patriot, the

284
Burns, on the Birth of
200 Printing, the Art of

203
Sonnet to the Muse of
203 Song, How sacred the hour!

134
Caledonia,
159 Sweet are the fair maids;

ib
Epigram,

l'il ne'er forget yon bonny Glen; 123
Epitaph,
285 Thou art sweet as the dew,

202
Farewell,

282 Where yonder woods are waving
Highland Castle, to the ruins of an old 131

green,

244
Homer, Scotch Translation of 76 Since Fortune siniles on thee, 285
-Beuk I.

163 Wallacc's Tower
Land of my Birth, the
239 Weeping Mary,

1.2
Lines,
243, 164 Verses after Moore;

S9
Love, the character of

on Love,

81
Macniel, Poor Flora,

242 on the prospect of leaving the coun.
Medea, Translation froin the

35 try for Glasgow College,
Moore, after

39 Picture of Man's life;

327

Extracts from New Publications:
Campbell ; or the Scottish Probationer, 245, Landaff, Bishop öf, extract of a Letter
Chapman's Picture of Glasgow,
40 from the late

87
Dufief, M. Extracts from the treatise of 165 Muir; Wiliam; Campsie, Poems by the
Fearon's Sketches of America,
125, 167 late

84
Gall, Richard, Poems and sougs by the Penanti's Narrative of a residence in Al.
late
286 giers,

124
Hodgson's, Dr. Synod Sermon; 207 Popular Superstitions of Clydesdale, 43, 86
Infection, method of avoiding, 44 Sleep, a Letter from
Kinnier's Travels,
42 Translations from Burger,

128

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