How Soccer Explains the World: An Unlikely Theory of Globalization

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Harper Collins, Jul 5, 2005 - Social Science - 261 pages
418 Reviews

“An eccentric, fascinating exposé of a world most of us know nothing about.”
—The New York Times Book Review

"An insightful, entertaining, brainiac sports road trip."
—The Wall Street Journal

"Foer’s skills as a narrator are enviable. His characterizations… are comparable to those in Norman Mailer's journalism."
—The Boston Globe

A groundbreaking work—named one of the five most influential sports books of the decade by Sports Illustrated—How Soccer Explains the World is a unique and brilliantly illuminating look at soccer, the world’s most popular sport, as a lens through which to view the pressing issues of our age, from the clash of civilizations to the global economy.

 

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Review: How Soccer Explains the World: An Unlikely Theory of Globalization

User Review  - Goodreads

The title is an abomination. I do not understand what Mr. Foer or his publisher were thinking. This book is long on anecdotes and short on explanations. In fact, there are almost no explanations as to ... Read full review

Review: How Soccer Explains the World: An Unlikely Theory of Globalization

User Review  - Ben - Goodreads

The title is an abomination. I do not understand what Mr. Foer or his publisher were thinking. This book is long on anecdotes and short on explanations. In fact, there are almost no explanations as to ... Read full review

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Contents

Prologue
1
e HOW SOCCER EXPLAINS
7
r HOW SOCCER EXPLAINS
35
t HOW SOCCER EXPLAINS
65
u HOW SOCCER EXPLAINS
89
the Survival of the Top Hats
115
o HOW SOCCER EXPLAINS
141
p HOW SOCCER EXPLAINS
167
a HOW SOCCER EXPLAINS
193
s HOW SOCCER EXPLAINS
217
the American Culture Wars
235
Note on Sources
249
Index
257
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Franklin Foer is the editor of The New Republic. He lives in Washington, D.C.

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