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unaccountable negleà left unguarded. The main budy, under Lord Percy, with ten field pieces, followed at a moderate distance, and the way being thus fuccessfully opened, the whole army passed the hills without noise or impediment, and descended by the town of Bedford into the lower country, which lay between them and Putnam's lines. The engagement was begun early in the morning by the Heffians, at Flat Bush, and by General Grant along the coast, and a warm cannonade, with a sharp fire of fmall arms, was eagerly supported on both sides for some hours. During this time the King's troops gained no advantage, but were upon the point of being repulsed, had not the thips in the mean time made several motions to the left, and attacked a battery on Red Hook, both to distract the right of the colonists who were engaged with General Grant, and to call off their attention totally from the left and rear, where their greatest danger lay. Those who were engaged with the Hessi. ans were the first who perceived the march of the Bri. tish army, and the danger they themfelves were in ; they accordingly retreated in large bodies, and in good order, with their artillery, with a defign to recover their camp. They were however attacked furioufly by the King's troops, and driven back into the woods, where they were met by the Hessians, and alternately intercepted and chased by the dragoons and light infantry. In these critical and defperate circumstances, fome of their regiments, though overpowered by numbers, forced their way to the lines, through all the difficulties and dangers that oppofed and furrounded them, Others, not less brave, perished in the attempt. Some kept the woods and escaped, while others, less fortunate, were loft under the same protec .

tion. The nature of the country, and the variety of situation, occafioned a repetition and continuance of small engagements, pursuits and daughter, which last, ed for many hours.

Had the skill and attention of the American Genea rals on this occasion been equal to the bravery of their troops, the British Generals would have repented their landing upon Long Illand; but Putnam suffered himfeif to be so effectually entrapped, that the bravery of his forces were rendered ineffectual through the want of capacity in their cammander. The right wing of the provincials, which was engaged with General Grant on the coait, were so late in knowing what was carrying on in other parts, that they were intercepted in their retreat by some of the British troops, who in the morning had not only turned round the hill upon their left, but had traversed the whole extent of the country in their rear. Such of them as did not flee to the woods, which were the greatest number, were obliged to throw themfelves into the marth at Cow. an's Cave, where many were drowned, and others. perished in the mud. A considerable number, how. ever, made their escape this way to the lines, though they were much thinned by the fire of the pursuers.

The loss of the Americans on this occasion was ve. ry considerable, but not so great as our accounts represented it; it was said that they lost 3,000 men including about 1000 prisoners. Almost a whole regi. ment from Maryland, consisting altogether of young men of the best families, were said to have been totally cut off, buc it was found afteșwards that many of thiefe had etcaped among the rest. Their own accounts do not ack.owledge any such numbers slain as our people affirmed; tho' it was confeised that they lost a

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unaccountable neglea left unguarded. The main budy, under Lord Percy, with tea field pieces, fol. lowed at a moderate distance, and the way being thus fuccessfully opened, the whole army passed the hills without noise or impediment, and descended by the town of Bedford into the lower country, which lay between them and Putnam's lines. The engagement was begun early in the morning by the Heffans, at Flat Bush, and by General Grant along the coast, and a warm cannonade, with a sharp fire of fmall arms, was eagerly supported on both sides for some hours. During this time the King's troops gained no advantage, but were upon the point of being repulsed, had not the thips in the mean time made several motions to the left, and attacked a battery on Red Hook, both to distract the right of the colonists who were engaged with General Grant, and to call off their attention totally from the left and rear, where their greatest danger lay. Those who were engaged with the Hessi. ans were the first who perceived the march of the Bri. tish army, and the danger they themfelves were in ; they accordingly retreated in large bodies, and in good order, with their artillery, with a defign to recover their camp. They were however attacked furiously by the King's troops, and driven back into the woods, where they were mer by the Hessians, and alternately intercepted and chased by the dragoons and light infantry. In these critical and desperate circumstances, fome of their regiments, though overpowered by numbers, forced their way to the lines, through all the difficulties and dangers that opposed and furrounded them, Others, not less brave, perished in the attempt. Some kept the woods and escaped, while 0-. thers, less fortunate, were loft under the same protec

tion. The nature of the country, and the variety of situation, occafioned a repetition and continuance of small engagements, pursuits and flaughter, which last. ed for many hours.

Had the skill and attention of the American Gene. rals on this occasion been equal to the bravery of their troops, the British Generals would have repented their landing upon Long Illand; but Putnam suffered himfeif to be so effectually entrapped, that the bravery of his forces were rendered ineffectual through the want of capacity in their cammander. The right wing of the provincials, which was engaged with General Grant on the coait, were so late in knowing what was carrying on in other parts, that they were intercepted in their retreat by some of the British troops, who in the morning had not only turned round the hill upon their left, but had traversed the whole extent of the country in their rear. Such of them as did not flee to the woods, which were the greatest number, were obliged to throw theinfelves into the marth at Cow. an's Cave, where many were drowned, and others perislied in the mud. A considerable number, how. ever, made their escape this way to the lines, though they were much thinned by the fire of the pursuers.

The loss of the Americans on this occasion was ve. ry considerable, but not so great as our accounts ren presented it; it was faid that they loft 3,000 men including about 1000 prisoners. Almost a whole regi. ment from Maryland, consisting altogether of young men of the best families, were said to have been totally cut off, but it was found afteșwards that many of thiefe had escaped among the rest. Their own accounts do not ackdowledge any such numbers slain as our people affirmed ; tho’ it was confeised that they lost a

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number of their best and bravest troops. But what was worst on their fide, this defeat dalhed all their hopes of success, and damped their spirits. New fol: diers, full of spirits and pride of bodily ftrength, can scarcely conceive any advantage over them, which the oid can derive from discipline, and a knowledge of their business. And if they are commanded, and skilfully led to action in this temper, so that those who oppose them are deprived of an opportnnity of turning these advantages to account, they will do wonderful execution ;'for as they are not capable of per. fectly understanding danger, and are not acquainted by cxperience of the pain and vexation of wounds, they are often more daring and adventurous than old foldiers. But when they find courage and strength 10:ally, useless and when they are making the greatest and, as they imagine, the most effectual efforts, and that they are furrounded, overpowered, and destroyed, by means that they cannot understand, they withdraw all due confidence from those things on which they had before placed too much, and ascribe an irresistible power to military skill and discipline, which they do not really possess. From these confiderations they abandon their natural strength, and it is geneTally a long time before they dare trust their new knowledge and skill so far as to bring it effectually to action.

The commanders of the provincial troops committed unpardonable errors on this occafion; they scarcely discovered as much prudence and discernment as the meanest country peasant would have done, had he been placed at the head of their army : they had taken no care to watch the motions of their enemy, nor to guard those passes that might have been easily, de

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