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to reduce the fort, set fire to all their works in the night and retired. It was never known what loss the provincials sustained in the several assaults upon this fort; in our accounts their loss of men is said to have been considerable, and certainly they must have suffered some lofs ;. but the whole troops that were in the fort were not equal in number te the half of the flain, on the side of the royal forces. The loss of our feet was not considerable, confidering the danger it was exposed to, though a great number were wounded, and several lost their lives on this occasion. The colonists left some artillery and stores, which fell into the hands of our troops. In a few days after Lord Cornwallis paffed over with a detachmept from Chester to Billings-Fort, where he was joined by a body of forces just arrived from NewYork. They marched all together to Red-Bank, which the provincials abandoned at their approach, leaving their artillery and some stores behind them.

The American shipping had now lost all protec. tion on either side of the river; their gallies and other veffels took the advantage of a favourable night to pass the Barriers of Philadelphia, and escaped to places of security farther up the river. To secure these an officer with a party of seamen was ordered to man the Delaware frigate, which was lately taken and lying at Philadelphia, and to take such measures as might prevent the remainder from escaping. The crews of the American vessels finding themselves surrounded, set fire to their ships and left them. 'About seventeen of different forts, including two floatingbatteries and fire-ships, were all consumed. After gaining all these advantages, the season of the year, and other obstructions, rendered the clearing of the river for any effectual purposes altogether impractiOo

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to reduce the fort, set fire to all their works in the night and retired. It was never known 'what loss the provincials sustained in the several assaults upon this fort ; in our accounts their loss of men is said to have been considerable, and certainly they must have suffered some loss ;. but the whole troops that were in the fort were not equal in number to the half of the flain, on the side of the royal forces. The loss of our Heet was not considerable, confidering the danger it was exposed to, though a great number were wounded, and several lost their lives on this occasion. The colonists left some artillery and stores, which fell into the hands of our troops. In a few days after Lord Cornwallis passed over with a detachment from Chester to Billings-Fort, where he was joined by a body of forces just arrived from NewYork. They marched all together to Red-Bank, which the provincials abandoned at their approach, leaving their artillery and fome stores behind them.

The American shipping had now lost all protection on either side of the river; their gallies and other vessels took the advantage of a favourable night to pass the Barriers of Philadelphia, and escaped to places of security farther up the river. To secure these an officer with a party of seamen was ordered to man the Delaware frigate, which was lately taken and lying at Philadelphia, and to take such measures as might prevent the remainder from escaping. The crews of the American veslels finding themselves surrounded, set fire to their ships and left them. ' About seventeen of different forts, including two floatingbatteries and fire-fhips, were all consumed. After gaining all these advantages, the season of the year, and other obstructions, rendered the clearing of the river for any effe&tual purposes altogether impracti

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cable, so that the making or discovering such a chanhel, as might admit of transports or vessels of eafy Burden with provisions and neceffaries for the use of the army, was all that could be obtained for the prefent.

Generať Washington was now reinforced with a Tecruit of 4000 men from the northern army, and advanced within 14 miles of Philadelphia, to a place called White March, where he encâmped in a strong fituation, with his right to the Wissahechon Creek, and his front partly covered by Sandy Run. This movement made General Howe imagine that he intended fome enterprize, and that his late reinforcement would encourage him to hazard a battle for the recovery of Philadelphia. This was not at all his intention ; he knew that his movement would suggest this idea to General Howe, and make him draw out his army to field, which in the middle of winter would harrass the troops, and distress both the men and officers. The English general imagined that either Wafhington would give him battle, or that if he observed his usual caution, there might be fome vulnerable part in his camp, where he might be attacked with fuccefs. For these reasons he marched his army on the 4th of December at night, and took post on Chefnut-hill, on the front of Wah.. ington's camp on the next inorning. Finding that their right afforded no opening for an attack, he changed his ground before day light upon the feventh, and took'a new station, oppofite to their centre and left. A few skirmishes happened, in which the king's troops were the conquerors, who pursued the flying parties almost to their works. The general continued for three days constantly in their fight, and advanced within a mile of their works; but when lie liad exa

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