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The baggage of the army, with such artillery, stores, and provisious, as the neceflity of the time would permit, were embarked with a strong detachment on board above 200 batteaux, and disparched, under convoy of five armed gallies, up the south river, in their way to Skenesborough. The main army took its route by the way of Castletown to reach the same place by land.

July 6. The first light of the morning had no fooner discovered the flight of the enemy, than their main body was eageriy pursued by Brigadier General Frazer, at the head of his brigade, consisting of the light troops, grenadiers, and some other corps. Major General Reiderel was also ordered to join in the pursuit by land, with the greater part of the Brunswick troops, either to support the Brigadier, or to act separately, as occasion might require, or circumstances direct. The enemy left a prodigious artillery behind them, which with those taken or destroyed in the armed vessels at Skenesborough, amounted to no lets than 128 pieces, of all sorts, ferviceable and 'unserviceable. They also left fome military stores of different forts, and no inconsiderable stock of provisions in the forts.

General Burgoyne conducted the pursuit by warer in person. 'That bridge and those works, which the Americans laboured hard for ten monies to render impenetrable, were cut through in less time by the British seamen and artificers, than it would have colt them to have described their stradure. In a word, they did their bufiness with such speed and effect, that not only the gun boats, but the Royal George and Inflexible frigates, had passed through the bridge by nine o'clock in the morning Sereral regiments

embarked

completion, through the spirit, judgment, and a&ive industry of General Phllips.

In these circumstances, a hafty council was on that day held by the American Generals, to which their principal went, as he informs us, already predetermined as to his conduct. It was represented, that their whole effective numbers were not sufficient to man one half of the works; that as the whole must be consequently upon constant duty, it would be impoffible for them to sustain the fatigue for any length of time ; and that as the enemy's batteries were ready to open, and the place would be completely invested on all sides within twenty-four hours, nothing could save the troops but an immediate evacuation of both posts. This determination was unanimously agreed to by the council, and the place was accordingly evacuated on that night.

However justly this representation of their condition and circumstance was founded, and however ne. cessary the determination of the council was in ths prefent state of their asiairs, one apparently capital error on the side of the commanders, must strike every common observer. If their force was not sufficient for the defence of the work, why did they nor form this resolution in time? Why did they not withdraw the troops, artillery, and stores, and demolish the works before the arrival of the enemy? Why did they wait to be nearly surrounded, until their retreat was more ruinous than a surrender under any condi. tions that could be proposed, and little less destructive in the event, than if the works had been carried by storm?

These are questions that time and better information alone can answer, if ever they should clearly an(wer, in favour of the American Generals.

The

The baggage of the army, with such artillery, stores, and provisious, as the neceflity of the time would permit, were embarked with a strong detachment on board above 200 batteaux, and dispatched, under convoy of five armed gallies, up the south river, in their way to Skenesborough. The main army took its route by the way of Castletown to reach the same place by land.

July 6. The first light of the morning had no fooner discovered the flight of the enemy, than their main body was eageriy pursued by Brigadier General Frazer, at the head of his brigade, consisting of the light troops, grenadiers, and some other corps. MajorGeneral Reidesel was also ordered to join in the purfuit by land, with the greater part of the Brunswick iroops, either to support the Brigadier, or to act see parately, as occasion might require, or circumstances direct. The enemy left a prodigious artillery behind them, which with those taken or destroyed in the ar: med vessels at Skenelborough, amounted to no lets than 128 pieces, of all sorts, ferviceable and unferviceable. They also left some military tłores of difo fereni sorts, and no inconsiderable stock of provisions in the forts:

General Burgoyne conducted the pursuit by water in person. 'That bridge and those works, which the Americans laboured hard for ten monts to render impenetrable, were cut through in less time by the British leamen and artificers, than it would have colt them to have described their structure. In a word, they did their bufiness with sach speed and effect, that not only the gun boats, but the Royal George and Inflexible frigates, had passed through the bridge by nine o'clock in the morning Sereral regiments

embarked

embarked on board the vessels, and the pursuit up the river was supported with such vigour, that by three o'clock in the afternoon, the foremost brigade of the gun-boats, was closely engaged with the enemies gallies near Skenesborough Falls. In the mean time, three regiments which had been landed at South. Bay, ascended and passed a mountain with great ex. pedition, in order to attack the enemy's works at the Falls, and thereby cut off their retreat. But their speedy flight prevented the execution of their design. Upon the approach of the frigates, the gallies, which were already overborne by the gun boats, lost all spirit ; two of them were accordingly taken, and three blown up. The rebels now giving way to their despair, set fire to their works, stockaded forts, mills, and batteaux, after which they escaped as well as they could up the Wood Creek. This stroke leemed to complete the ruin of their ill-fated army, for their batteaux were deeply loaded, besides their baggage, with ammunition, stores, and provisions ; so that they were now left naked in the woods, destitute of provision, and without any other means of defence, than . what they derived from the arms in their hands.

Confufion and dismay, equally attended their main body on the left.

The soldiers had lost all respect for, and confidence in their commanders.' It would be fruitless to expect resolution, where no order nor command could be maintained...

Brigadier Frazer continued and supported the chace through the vehement heat of a burning day, with his usual activity and vigour. Having received intelligence that the enemy's rear were at no great distance and were commanded by Colonel Francis one of their beit and bravest officers, his troops lay that night on

their arms. He came up with the enemy, on the 7th, at five in the morning, whom he found strongly posted, with great advantage of ground, and a fill greater superiority in point of number. As he expected every moment to be joined by General Reidsel, and was apprehensive that the enemy might escape if he delayed, he did not hesitate to begin the attack.The advantages which they possessed in ground and Dumber, and perhaps more than both, the goodness of their commander, induced them to make a better stand than might have been expected from their condition in other respects.

As Frazer's corps was not supported near so soon as had been expected, the engagement was long :and though the light infantry and grenadiers gave several striking proofs of their superiority, affairs were still undecided and critical. The arrival of the Ger. mans was at length decicive. The enemy fled on all sides, leaving their brave commander, with many other officers, and about 200 private men, dead on the field. About the same number, besides a colonel, feven Captains, and ten Subalterns were taken prison

Above 600 were supposed to be wounded, many of whom perished miserably in the woods. The principal loss on the side of the royal army, was that of Major Grant, a brave officer, who was killed.--, St. Clair, with the van of the American army, was at this time at Castletown, about fix miles farther on.Upon the account of this disaster, and of the more fatal stroke at Skenesborough, and under the apprehenfion of being intercepted at Fort Anne, he struck . on to the woods on his left, probably uncertain whether he should direct his course towards the New Rr

England

ers.

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