Going Dutch: How England Plundered Holland's Glory

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Feb 22, 2011 - History - 432 pages

On November 5, 1688, William of Orange, Protestant ruler of the Dutch Republic, landed at Torbay in Devon with a force of twenty thousand men. Five months later, William and his wife, Mary, were jointly crowned king and queen after forcing James II to abdicate. Yet why has history recorded this bloodless coup as an internal Glorious Revolution rather than what it truly was: a full-scale invasion and conquest by a foreign nation?

The remarkable story of the relationship between two of Europe's most important colonial powers at the dawn of the modern age, Lisa Jardine's Going Dutch demonstrates through compelling new research in political and social history how Dutch tolerance, resourcefulness, and commercial acumen had effectively conquered Britain long before William and his English wife arrived in London.

 

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User Review  - Eyejaybee - LibraryThing

In this entertaining study of British history from the late seventeenth century Professor Jardine analyses he steps that brought about the Glorious Revolution which saw James II deposed in favour of ... Read full review

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User Review  - jcbrunner - LibraryThing

Having bought a secondhand paperback copy of this book, an appropriate Dutch manner, I found Lisa Jardine's writing amusing but clearly below her usual standard. The title does this book a severe ... Read full review

Contents

Preface
ii
Consorts of Viols Theorbos
clxxxviii
Competition Market
cxlv
Conclusion
clxxix
Bibliography of Secondary Sources
cxcv
Index
ccxiii
Names Money and Dates
ccliii

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About the author (2011)

Lisa Jardine, Commander of the Order of the British Empire, is the director of the Centre for Editing Lives and Letters, the centenary professor of Renaissance Studies at Queen Mary, University of London, and a fellow of the Royal Historical Society. She lives with her husband and three children in London.

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