Political and Literary Anecdotes of His Own Times

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J. Murray, 1819 - Anecdotes - 252 pages

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Page 8 - O God, if there be a God, save my soul, if I have a soul!
Page 209 - M'Namara returned to London and reported the Prince's answer to the gentlemen who had employed him, they were astonished and confounded. However, they soon resolved on the measures which they were to pursue for the future, and determined no longer to serve a man who could not be persuaded to serve himself, and chose rather to endanger the lives of his best and most faithful friends than part with an harlot whom, as he often declared, he neither loved nor esteemed.
Page 197 - If I was surprised to find him there, I was still more astonished when he acquainted me with the motives which had induced him to hazard a journey to England at this juncture. The impatience of his friends who were in exile, had formed a scheme which was impracticable ; but although...
Page 101 - That great captain, the DUKE of MARLBOROUGH, when he was in the last stage of life, and very infirm, would walk from the public rooms in Bath to his lodgings in a cold dark night to save sixpence in chair hire.
Page 197 - ... motives which had induced him to hazard a journey to England at this juncture. The impatience of his friends who were in exile had formed a scheme which was impracticable ; but although it had been as feasible as they had represented it to him, yet no preparation had been made, nor was anything ready to carry it into execution.
Page 27 - As he was passing through the Court of Requests, he met a member of the contrary party, whose avarice he imagined would not reject a large bribe. He took him aside, and said, " Such a question comes on this day; give me your vote, and here is a bank bill of 2000...
Page 206 - ... proceeded so far as to assure him, according to his instructions, that an immediate interruption of all correspondence with his most powerful friends in England, and in short that the ruin of his interest, which was now daily increasing, would be the infallible consequence of his refusal ; yet he continued inflexible, and all M'Namara's entreaties and remonstrances were ineffectual.
Page 199 - He has an handsome face and good eyes; (I think his busts, which about this time were commonly sold in London, are more like him than any of his pictures which I have yet seen;) but in...
Page 241 - He had had two children by his wife when he departed from her, who were both living at that time: but they both died young in a few years after. However, during their lives, the second or third year after their father disappeared, Mrs. Howe was obliged to apply for an act of parliament to procure a proper settlement of her husband's estate, and a provision for herself out of it during his absence, as it was uncertain whether he was alive or dead: this act he suffered to be solicited...
Page 183 - Five hundred pounds!" said the Bishop : "what a shame for a Bishop to have such a sum in his possession!

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