Autobiographical Writings by Early Quaker Women

Front Cover
David Booy
Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., 2004 - Literary Criticism - 211 pages
While writings by early modern Quaker women have been discussed and quoted fairly extensively, relatively few of their texts are readily or widely available. The chief purpose of this edition is to rectify this state of affairs in one central area - that of autobiographical writing. The edition contains substantial excerpts from a range of self-writings by Quaker women, composed between the 1650s and circa 1710: letters, testimonies, memoirs, accounts of spiritual development, narratives of persecution and imprisonment. Six of the texts have been freshly edited from manuscripts (including Mary Penington's A Brief Account); the others have been transcribed from the first printed editions. In his general introduction to the volume, the editor sketches the history of the Quaker movement from the 1650s to the early 1700s, and considers the role of female Quakers during the first and second phases of the movement.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Chronicles 79
7
A true account of the great
26
Daniel 34 117 12930
34
Deuteronomy
44
An account of her experiences during her visits
62
A brief account of some of my Exercise from
73
Ecclesiastes 80 182 184
79
A relation of the labour travail and suffering excerpt
108
Jonah 130 173
130
A Relation of Margaret Fell excerpt The
147
An apostateconscience exposed excerpt
161
A legacy or widows mite excerpt
167
Judges 59 170 171
170
Elizabeth Webb A letter to Anthony William Boehm excerpt
183
A Memorable Instance
189
References to Books of the Bible
204

An account of the birth and education with
114
Galatians 12 35 41 51 82
122

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2004)

David Booy is a Senior Lecturer in English at Anglia Polytechnic University, Cambridge, UK.

Bibliographic information