The Long Ago and the Later on: Or, Recollections of Eighty Years

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A.M. Robertson, 1904 - California - 289 pages
 

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Page 270 - Oh, East is East, and West is West, and never the twain shall meet, Till Earth and Sky stand presently at God's great Judgment Seat; But there is neither East nor West, Border, nor Breed, nor Birth, When two strong men stand face to face, though they come from the ends of the earth!
Page 95 - What cannot wine perform? It brings to light The secret soul; it bids the coward fight; Gives being to our hopes, and from our hearts Drives the dull sorrow, and inspires new arts. Is there a wretch, whom bumpers have not taught A flow of words, and loftiness of thought? Even in th' oppressive grasp of poverty I can enlarge and bid the soul be free.
Page 94 - Biron they call him ; but a merrier man, Within the limit of becoming mirth, I never spent an hour's talk withal : His eye begets occasion for his wit ; For every object that the one doth catch The other turns to a mirth-moving jest...
Page 95 - ... a merrier man, Within the limit of becoming mirth, I never spent an hour's talk withal : His eye begets occasion for his wit : For every object that the one doth catch, The other turns to a mirth-moving jest ; Which his fair tongue (conceit's expositor) Delivers in such apt and gracious words, That aged ears play truant at his tales, And younger hearings are quite ravished ; So sweet and voluble is his discourse.
Page 257 - It is better to go to the house of mourning, than to go to the house of feasting: for that is the end of all men; and the living will lay it to his heart. Sorrow is better than laughter: for by the sadness of the countenance the heart is made better.
Page 59 - I agree not to use profane language, not to get drunk, not to gamble, not to treat animals cruelly, and not to do anything else that is incompatible with the conduct of a gentleman...
Page 95 - Sweet as refreshing dews, or summer showers To the long parching thirst of drooping flowers; Grateful as fanning gales to fainting swains, And soft as trickling balm to bleeding pains, Such are thy words.
Page 96 - I love the sailor ; — his eventful life — His generous spirit — his contempt of danger — His firmness in the gale, the wreck, and strife ; — And, though a wild and reckless ocean-ranger, God grant he make that port, when life is o'er, Where storms are hush'd, and billows break no more ! REV.
Page 96 - There's nought in this bad world like sympathy : 'Tis so becoming to the soul and face ; Sets to soft music the harmonious sigh, And robes sweet friendship in a Brussels lace.
Page 108 - ... wanton. Many the quips and jests which I have heard from thee, but I have noted that there was never malice behind thy humor, and never sting to mar the honey of thy wit. And now, O best beloved of the Owl; the time draws near when we must part. I break the silence of unnumbered years to say, "Farewell !

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