Royal Descents and Pedigrees of Founders' Kin

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Harrison, 1864 - Families of royal descent - 400 pages
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Page 75 - Then the fore-mentioned gentleman returned, and conducted him back to his school. Some time after, the same gentleman came to him again, with a horse and proper accoutrements, and told him he must take a journey with him into the country. They went into Leicestershire, and came to Bosworth field; and he was carried to King Richard III.'s tent. The king embraced him, and told him he was his son. " But, child," says he, " to-morrow I must fight for my crown.
Page 2 - Stimulated by these words, or rather by the Divine inspiration, and allured by the beautifully illuminated letter at the beginning of the volume, he spoke before all his brothers, who, though his seniors in age, were not so in grace, and answered, " Will you really give that book to...
Page 75 - Sir, you have a numerous family ; I have been used to live retired ; give me leave to build a house of one room for myself, in such a field, and there, with your good leave, I will live and die.
Page 90 - ... mercy, In Westminster as he did stand, On a certain day in a study, A book of reason he had in his hand, And so sore his study he did apply, That his tender tears fell on the ground, All men might see that stood him by : There were both earls and lords of land, But none of them durst speak but I. I came before my father the king...
Page 81 - I saw one of them, who was Duke of Exeter* (but he concealed his name), following the Duke of Burgundy's train bare-foot and bare-legged, begging his bread from door to door. This person was the next of the house of Lancaster ; he had married King Edward's sister, and being afterwards known, had a small pension allowed him for his subsistence.
Page 89 - Heare is no more but you and I ; King Edward that was my father dear, On whose estate God had mercy, In Westminster as he did stand, On a certain day in a study, A book of reason he had in his hand, And so sore his study he did apply, That his tender tears fell on the ground, All men might see that stood him by : There were both earls and lords of land, But none of them durst speak but I.
Page 93 - ... dissension. When the commons presented to the king the usual grant of tonnage and poundage for life, they coupled with it a petition, that he would be pleased to " take to wife and consort the princess Elizabeth, which | " marriage they hoped God would bless with a progeny
Page 28 - England," again to quote the judicious Camden, "certain it is, that as the better sort, even from the Conquest, by little and little took surnames, so they were not settled among the common people fully until about the time of Edward the Second.
Page 5 - Why, man ! do you sit thinking there, and are too proud to turn the bread ? Whatever be your family, with such manners and sloth, what trust can be put in you hereafter ? If you were even a nobleman, you will be glad to eat the bread which you neglect to attend to.
Page 66 - And all men of this our realm, as well spiritual as temporal (as much as in them is), shall observe the same against all persons in like wise.

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