The Iliad of Homer: With an Interlinear Translation, for the Use of Schools and Private Learners, on the Hamiltonian System as Improved by Thomas Clark

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David McKay, publisher, 1888 - 367 pages
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Page vi - ... the next best is to have him taught as near this way as may be, which is by taking some easy and pleasant book, such as ./Esop's fables, and writing the English translation (made as literal as it can be) in one line, and the Latin words, which answer each of them, just over it in another.
Page vi - Latin and Greek, how many years are spent in it, and what a noise and business it makes to no purpose, I can hardly forbear thinking, that the parents of children still live in fear of the schoolmaster's rod, which they look on as the only instrument of education; as if a language or two were its whole business.
Page vi - ... be the true and genuine way, and that which I would propose, not only as the easiest and best, wherein a child might, without pains or chiding, get a language, which others are wont to be whipped for at school, six or seven years together...
Page vii - ... by heart, may facilitate his acquaintance with the genius and manner of the Latin tongue, which varies the signification of verbs and nouns not as the modern languages do by particles prefixed but by changing the last syllables. More than this of grammar, I think he need not have till he can read himself Sanctii Minerva...
Page vi - English has been, without the perplexity of rules, talked into him; for, if you will consider it, Latin is no more unknown to a child, when he comes into the world, than English: and yet he learns English without master, rule, or grammar: and so might he Latin too, as Tully did, if he had somebody always to talk to him in this language.
Page vii - And I would fain have any one name to me that tongue, that any one can learn or speak as he should do, by the rules of grammar. Languages were made not by rules or art, but by accident, and the common use of the people. And he that will speak them well, has no other rule but that...
Page vi - But if such a man cannot be got, who speaks good Latin, and, being able to instruct your son in all these parts of knowledge, will undertake it by this method ; the next best is to have him taught as near this way as may be, which is by taking some easy and pleasant book, such as jEsop's Fables...
Page vii - Nor let the objection, that he will then know it only by rote, fright any one. This, when well considered, is not of any moment against, but but plainly for, this way of learning a language ; for languages are only to be learned by rote...
Page v - ... to them, they might then forthwith proceed to learn the substance of good things and arts in due order, which would bring the whole language quickly into their power.
Page vii - When, by this way of interlining Latin and English one with another, he has got a moderate knowledge of the Latin tongue, he may then be advanced a little farther to the reading of some other easy Latin book, such as Justin, or Eutropius; and to make the reading and understanding of it the less tedious and difficult to him, let him help himself, if he please, with the English translation.

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