Page images
PDF

possibly attend it ?—The design is his own, as in pArt will be the execution.—He may perhaps be angry when he finds out the deceit.—Well —he deceives himself; and faults we commit ourselves, we seldom find much difficulty in pardoning.

--'' .. / AHU .

Hence with caution, hence with fear,

Beauty prompts, and nought shall stay vie;

Boldly for that prize I steer;

Rochs, nor winds, nor waves dismay me. 420

Yet, rash lover, looh behind,

Thinh what evils may betide yov;
Love andfortune both are blind,

And you have none else to guide you.

-' - , - .' :- , . . vf''. SCENE Fir. , .. ... .—v.

Changes to a handsome Dressing-room, supposed, to: Ik" Clarissa's. On one side, between the fViiigs,^i\i Table with a Glass, Boxes, and two Chairs. DrANA enters before Jessamy.

'-' . '1 .-;;«(

Dian. Come, brother, I undertake to be mistress, of the ceremony upon this occasion, aod introduce

i'ou to your first audience. Miss Flowerdale is not

here, I perceive; but no matter.— . ,« ,

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors][ocr errors]

-if ) A: ,'clarjssa, Mr. Jessamy.

'iCfeai-.* Sfr, I took the liberty to desire a few moment'* private conversation with you—I hope you will excuse it-*— I am, really, greatly embarrassed. But, in an af* fair of such immediate consequence to us both-—;

Mr. Jes. My dear creature, don't be embariass'd before me; 1 should be extremely sorry to strike you with any awe; but, this is a species of mauvaise honte, which the company I shall introduce you to, wnt soon cure you of.* .''"' : v.t". \

Clar. Upon mjfeword, Sir, I don't understand you.

Mr. Jes. Perhaps you may be under some uneasiness lest I should not 'life'quite so w arm in the prosecution of this affair,'as you could wish: it is true with regard to quality, I might do better; and, with regard to fortune, full as well—But, you please me— Upon my soul, I have not met with any thing more agreeable to me a great while. Clar. Pray, Sir, keep your seat. Mr. Jes. Mauvaise honte again. My dear, there is nothing in these little familiarities between you and me—When we are married, I shall do every thing to render your life happy. 5°9 Clar. Ah! Sir, pardon me. The happiness of my

life depends upon a circumstance

Mr. Jes. Oh! I understand you—You have been told, I suppose, of the Italian opera girl—Rat peoples* tongues—However, 'tis true, I had an affair with her at Naples, and she is now here. But, be satisfied: I'll give her a thousand pounds, and send her about her business.

Clar. Me, Sir! I protest nobody told me—Lord! I never heard any such thing, or enquired about it. Mi. Jes. No I have they not been chattering to you

of my affair at Pisa, with the Principessa del ■

Clar. No, indeed, Sir.

Mr. Jes. Well, I was afraid they might, because, in this rude country—But, why silent on a sudden I —don't be afraid to speak.

Clar. No, Sir, I will come to the subject, on which I took the liberty to trouble you—Indeed, I have great reliance on your generosity.

Mr. Jes. You'll find me generous as a prince, depend on't. 53°

Clar. I am bless'd, Sir, with one of the best of fa

« PreviousContinue »