Two Lectures on the Remains of Ancient Pagan Britain: Illus. by Nearly Forty Lithographic Drawings

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author, 1833 - Great Britain - 79 pages

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Page 6 - And he lighted upon a certain place, and tarried there all night because the sun was set ; and he took of the stones of that place, and put them for his pillows, and lay down in that place to sleep.
Page 62 - The children gather wood, and the fathers kindle the fire, and the women knead their dough, to make cakes to the queen of heaven, and to pour out drink offerings unto other gods, that they may provoke me to anger.
Page 58 - Ye shall utterly destroy all the places, wherein the nations which ye shall possess served their gods, upon the high mountains, and upon the hills, and under every green tree: 3 And ye shall overthrow their altars, and break their pillars, and burn their groves with fire; and ye shall hew down the graven images of their gods, and destroy the names of them out of that place.
Page 6 - And thy seed shall be as the dust of the earth; and thou shalt spread abroad to the west and to the east, and to the north and to the south, and in thee and in thy seed shall all the families of the earth be blessed.
Page 6 - And he was afraid, and said, How dreadful is this place ! This is none other but the house of God, and this is the gate of heaven.
Page 50 - There they buried Abraham and Sarah his wife ; there they buried Isaac and Rebekah his wife ; and there I buried Leah.
Page 9 - When your children shall ask their fathers in time to come, saying, What mean these stones ? Then ye shall let your children know, saying, Israel came over this Jordan on dry land.
Page 7 - This heap be witness, and this pillar be witness, that I will not pass over this heap to thee, and that thou shalt not pass over this heap and this pillar unto me, for harm.
Page 50 - And they buried him in his own sepulchres, which he had made for himself in the city of David, and laid him in the bed which was filled with sweet odours and divers kinds of spices prepared by the apothecaries' art : and they made a very great burning for him.
Page 40 - The car, the car of war comes on, like the flame of death ! the rapid car of Cuthullin, the noble son of Semo! It bends behind like a wave near a rock ; like the sun-streaked mist of the heath. Its sides are embossed with stones, and sparkle like the sea round the boat of night. Of polished yew is its beam ; its seat of the smoothest bone. The sides are replenished with spears; the bottom is the footstool of heroes...

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