The ambulator; or, The stranger's companion in a tour round London, collected by a gentleman [J. Bew?].

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Page 5 - I consider the vanity of grieving for those whom we must quickly follow : when I see kings lying by those who deposed them, when I consider rival wits placed side by side, or the holy men that divided the world with their contests and disputes, I reflect with sorrow and astonishment on the little competitions, factions, and debates of mankind.
Page 250 - Father of light and life, thou Good Supreme ! O teach me what is good ; teach me Thyself! Save me from folly, vanity, and vice, From every low pursuit ; and feed my soul With knowledge, conscious peace, and virtue pure ; Sacred, substantial, never-fading bliss!
Page 111 - The letter, as I live, with all the business I writ to his holiness. Nay then, farewell ! I have touch'd the highest point of all my greatness; And, from that full meridian of my glory, I haste now to my setting: I shall fall Like a bright exhalation in the evening, And no man see me more.
Page 89 - In the worst inn's worst room, with mat half-hung, The floors of plaster, and the walls of dung, On once a flock-bed, but repair'd with straw, With tape-tied curtains, never meant to draw, The George and Garter dangling from that bed Where tawdry yellow strove with dirty red, Great Villiers lies — alas!
Page 112 - Through him the rays of regal bounty shine, Turn'd by his nod the stream of honour flows, His smile alone security bestows : Still to new heights his restless wishes tow'r, Claim leads to claim, and pow'r advances pow'r ; Till conquest unresisted ceas'd to please, And rights submitted left him none to seize. At length his sov'reign frowns — the train of state Mark the keen glance, and watch the sign to hate.
Page 90 - Of mimic'd statesmen and their merry king. No wit to flatter left of all his store! No fool to laugh at, which he valued more. There, victor of his health, of fortune, friends, And fame, this lord of useless thousands ends.
Page 5 - When I look upon the tombs of the great, every emotion of envy dies in me ; when I read the epitaphs of the beautiful, every inordinate desire goes out; when I meet with the grief of parents upon a tombstone, my heart melts with compassion ; when I see the tomb of the parents themselves, I consider the vanity of grieving for those whom we must quickly follow.
Page 93 - I seem through consecrated walks to rove ; I hear soft music die along the grove : Led by the sound, I roam from shade to shade, By godlike poets venerable made : Here his first lays majestic Denham sung ; There the last numbers flow'd from Cowley's tongue.
Page 112 - In full-blown dignity, see Wolsey stand, Law in his voice, and fortune in his hand: To him the church, the realm, their pow'rs consign, Thro...
Page 144 - My Lord, I am a great deal older than your Grace, and have, I believe, heard more arguments for Atheism than ever your Grace did ; but I have lived long enough to see there is nothing in them ; and so, I hope, your Grace will.

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